Asbestos Exposure Immunological parameters and Mesothelioma Disease

Asbestos Exposure Immunological parameters and Mesothelioma Disease

One interesting study is called, “Asbestos fibre counting by image analysis” by L. C. KENNY – Oxford Journals Medicine – The Annals of Occupational Hygiene Volume 28, Issue 4 Pp. 401-415 – Health and Safety Executive 403 Egware Rd, London NW2 6LN, U.K.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Manchester University’s Asbestos fibre-counting Program (MAP) now performs satisfactorily on the Magiscan image-analyser for most industrial samples. Further work to develop the software is unlikely to produce proportionate improvement in performance. From the available data, MAP counts are not distinguishable within the range of results from visual-counting laboratories either internationally, when using the European Reference Method (ERM), or nationally, using inhouse methods or the ERM. When compared with those visual counters employed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) who are trained and practised in the ERM, MAP results are not distinguishable at concentrations above approximately 0.3 fibres ml−1. MAP counts relatively high at concentrations below 0.3 fibres ml−1, but is still within the confidence limits established from quality control with HSE’s in-house method. MAP performance on routine samples taken after delagging operations has not yet been investigated fully. HSE are now using the MAP in conjunction with Magiscan for routine monitoring of asbestos concentrations, taking these factors into account.”

Another interesting study is called, “Light microscope studies on the effects of chrysotile asbestos and fiber glass on the morphology and reticulin formation of cultured lung fibroblasts” by  R. J. Richards, and F. Jacoby – Environmental Research – Volume 11, Issue 1, February 1976, Pages 112-121.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Chrysotile asbestos is highly cytotoxic when initially added to cultured lung fibroblasts, and this is reflected by cell death and by nuclear, nucleolar, and cytoplasmic abnormalities. Renewed growth and recovery of the culture occurs, but the subsequent deposition of reticulin is atypical. The results presented are correlated with earlier biochemical studies and subsequent electronmicroscopical investigations. Fiber glass causes little cell destruction, yet produces similar morphological changes but to a much lesser degree.”

Another interesting study is called, “Asbestos exposure as a cause of immunological stimulation.” By Huuskonen MS, Räsänen JA, Härkönen H, Asp S. – Scand J Respir Dis. 1978;59(6):326-32.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Twenty immunological parameters were determined for 37 asbestos-exposed workers with no radiographic pulmonary fibrosis and 132 asbestosis patients, 37 of whom formed a matched referent group for the non-diseased workers. No clear differences between the matched groups were found for the autoantibodies tested, but the prevalence of autoantibodies was increased in both groups in comparison with the prevalence among Finnish blood donor candidates. This phenomenon may reflect a general immunological activity caused by asbestos dust, and this immunological activity may act as an adjuvant in immunisation. The patients revealed a high level of IgA, C3, C4 and alpha-1-antitrypsin. This result indicates that these factors may be related to the development of asbestosis, and could therefore be utilized in the evaluation of diffuse pulmonary fibrosis among workers with asbestos exposure.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read them in their entirety.

 

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please click on the following links:

Depuy ASR Recall

Depuy ASR Recall

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