Archive for the ‘Asbestos Disease Mesothelioma’ Category

Mesothelioma Symptoms – Swelling Abdomen

www.mesovideolibrary.com – Shelly discusses how Craig’s swollen, hard abdomen were a symptom of peritoneal mesothelioma. He was also retaining fluid and appeared pregnant. You can watch this video on our official website www.mesovideolibrary.com If you have questions about any of the symptoms of mesothelioma, call us at 866-404-5805 or e-mail us at info@mesovideolibrary.com.

Asbestos claims continue to rise

Asbestos claims continue to rise
The latest figures from the New South Wales Dust Diseases Board reveals that payouts for the asbestos caused disease mesothelioma are continuing to increase.
Read more on ABC via Yahoo!7 News

Advice For Asbestos Assistive Article

Advice For Asbestos Assistive Article

You see, we should be very thankful that we are born in this modern generation because of the existence of the Internet. With the Internet, every information (whether about advice for asbestos or any other such as dental services, dental whitening system, teeth whitening stain or even laser tooth bleaching) can be found with ease on the Internet, with great articles like this.

If you go to your dentist for a teeth-whitening procedure, your dentist will also be able to give you advice on how to maintain your new white teeth. While it’s true that you will be spending a considerable amount of money when you go to a dentist, the cost is worth it because you will be getting quality service and advice.

Zoom teeth whitening is completely safe and will not harm your gums.  In fact, the special light used during the ZOOM teeth whitening process has been show to be healthy for gums.

Most people today place high importance on appearance. For many, having a set of good, white teeth is vital for looking good in public. Just look at how many teeth whitening products are currently available on the market.

Don’t forget to realize that this article can cover information related to advice for asbestos but can still leave some stones unturned. Head on over to the search engines for more specific advice for asbestos information.

Before using any teeth whitening kits one should always consult a doctor, who can advice or prescribe the right teeth whitening products for your teeth type. But before buying the teeth whitening product one should be sure of the quality and check the ADA (American Dental Association) seal of acceptance on the label of the product. Only the ADA ensures the safety and effectiveness of all the teeth whitening product out in the market.

Many of these white lights use the same technology that dentist office uses! The differences is you are saving quite a bit by making your teeth whiter at home.

People dedicated to a busy lifestyle should use professional methods of teeth whitening for perfecta teeth whitening, while others can patiently bleach at home using home-based methods.

Many people searching for advice for asbestos also searched online for teeth whitening gel for trays, dentist whitening, and even teeth whitened.

So here is chance to get your free tips on asbestos disease and in addition to that get basic information on saving money visit asbestos claim


Article from articlesbase.com

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Examination of Crocidolite Amosite and Anthophyllite Asbestos Fibers

Examination of Crocidolite Amosite and Anthophyllite Asbestos Fibers

Every year there are over 2,000 new cases of mesothelioma diagnosed in the United States because of asbestos exposure.  This fact has been a major force behind the research aimed at better understanding the disease and someday finding a cure.  One important study is called, “Electron Miscroscopical Investigation of Asbestos Fibers” by Arthur M. Langer, Anne D. Mackler, and Fred D. Pooley – Environmental Health Perspectives Vol. 9, pp 68-80, 1974.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Examination of asbestos fibers by electron microscopical techniques enables the observer to distinguish among the fiber types by morphological and structural characteristics. Chrysotile asbestos fibers are composed of bundles of fibrils. Fibers are often curvilinear with splayed ends. Individual fibrils consist of a central capillary defined by an electron dense crystalline wall. With increasing time of electron bombardment, the capillary wall decreases in thickness, deforms, and is encapsulated in an electron translucent material. The change in electron opacity is considered to be a product of structural disruption brought about by dehydroxylation due to electron radiation. A well recognized sequential deformation pattern may be used for identification purposes. Amphibole fibers tend to be straight, splintery, and electron-opaque, although curved fibers are occasionally observed. Diffraction contrast figures are visible as dark bands moving parallel and at right angles to the fiber axis. Crocidolite forms the shortest and thinnest fibers, followed in size by amosite and anthophyllite. Size distribution characteristics of the amphibole fiber types are different. The selected area electron diffraction pattern for chrysotile is unique. Reflections range in forms from streaked to arcuate. Reflection intensity and shape are related to the degree of openness of the fiber bundle and the extent of physical degradation of the fiber. The amphibole asbestos fibers possess diffraction patterns having similar characteristics prohibiting individual identification. Microchemical analysis is required for identification in such cases. A discussion of the industrial hygiene threshold limit values for ampliphibole asbestos fibers is presented. The discussion is based on their differing size distribution characteristics.

Another interesting study is called, “Comparison of alveolar and interstitial macrophages in fibroblast stimulation after silica and long or short asbestos” by Adamson, I.Y.R. ; Bowden, D.H. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg – Journal Volume: 5:5; Conference: 75. annual meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), Atlanta, GA (United States), 21-25 Apr 1991.  Here is an excerpt: “Pulmonary fibrosis in response to particles has been attributed to secretion of fibroblast growth factors (FGF) by alveolar macrophages (AM). However, since fibrosis is interstitial and is associated with particle retention by interstitial macrophages (IM), the authors have now compared the secretory activity of FGF by rat alveolar (AM) and interstitial macrophages (IM) in response to silica and to long or short asbestos fibers. AM were obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage, and IM by collecting macrophages that migrate from explants of a previously lavaged and perfused lung. Isolated Am and IM from fibrotic lungs, 6 weeks after instilling silica, secreted equal amounts of FGF. Six weeks after giving short asbestos fibers in vivo, lavaged AM secreted FGF in vitro, but there was no change in fibroblast growth and no fibrosis in vivo. After giving long fibers, which reach the interstitium, isolated IM secreted FGF and collagen levels were increased in whole lung. When macrophages were isolated from normal rats and exposed to particles in vitro, Am and IM supernatants contained equal amounts of FGF. The results show that these macrophage populations respond equally to particles with respect to FGF secretion. The fibrotic reaction seen in vivo is likely due to the close proximity to fibroblasts to particle-laden macrophages within the interstitium allowing more efficient transfer of growth factors.”

If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.  We all owe a debt of gratitude to these researchers.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

California Mesothelioma Lawyer,

Mesothelioma Lawyers San Diego,

Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Attorney


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Understanding Cellular and Enzyme Responses of Chrysotile Asbestos

Understanding Cellular and Enzyme Responses of Chrysotile Asbestos

Occupational exposure to asbestos causes the death of thousands of people each year.  This has led to an almost unparalleled body of research trying to better understand asbestos and its link to mesothelioma disease.  One interesting study is called, “Kinetics of the bronchoalveolar leucocyte response in rats during exposure to equal airborne mass concentrations of quartz, chrysotile asbestos, or titanium dioxide.” by K Donaldson, R E Bolton, A Jones, G M Brown, M D Robertson, J Slight, H Cowie, and J M Davis – Thorax 1988;43:525-533.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – The kinetics of the bronchoalveolar response was assessed in rats exposed, at equal airborne mass concentration (10 mg/m3), to titanium dioxide–a non-pathogenic dust–and the two pathogenic mineral dusts quartz and chrysotile asbestos. Rats were killed at intervals over a 75 day exposure period and groups of rats exposed for 32 and 75 days after recovery for two months. Bronchoalveolar lavage was carried out and the lavage fluid characterised for cellular content, macrophage activation, and concentrations of free total protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Inhalation exposure to the two pathogenic dusts resulted in an increased number of leucocytes, macrophage activation, and increased levels of free enzymes and total protein. The pattern and magnitude of the responses to quartz and chrysotile differed. Chrysotile caused less inflammation than quartz, and the main cellular response peaked around the middle of the period of dust exposure whereas the highest levels of enzymes occurred towards the end. The difference in timing suggests that macrophages were not available for lavage towards the end of the exposure, owing to their playing a part possibly in deposition of granulation tissue. Quartz caused a greater cellular and enzyme response than chrysotile, particularly towards the end of the dust exposure phase. There was a noticeable progression of inflammation in the quartz exposed groups left to recover for two months, but not in the chrysotile recovery groups.”

A second article that is interesting is called, “Chemical Characterization of Asbestos Body Cores by Electron Microprobe Analysis” by Arthur M. Langer, Ivan B. Rubin, and Irving J. Selikoff – Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Mount Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10029 – Journal of histochemistry and Cytochemistry May 18, 1972.  Here is an excerpt: “Inhalation of asbestos may be associated with increased risk of developing malignant neoplasms. Some of the fibers become coated in the lung, resulting in “asbestos bodies.” The occurrence of structures with the appearance of asbestos bodies in the lungs of urban dwellers the world over, individuals with no known exposure to these mineral fibers, has raised the question of whether the community at large may also have increased risk of neoplasia as the result of chance environmental asbestos exposure. Since other fibrous materials may also sometimes become so coated, epidemiology evaluation of the presence of asbestos bodies has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining absolute identification of the cores of the bodies found. Five fibrous silicates, consisting of four amphiboles (amosite, anthophyllite, crocidolite and tremolite) and one serpentine (chrysotile), constitute the asbestos mineral group. Chemically, they are diverse enough for unique identification. The electron microprobe analyzer permits microchemical analysis of particles in the sublight microscopic size range. Analysis of asbestos body cores requires particle selection, extraction from tissue matrix, a suitable conducting substrate, proper coating material, selection of optimal instrumental operating conditions and comparison of unknown cores with known fiber standards. In this investigation, asbestos body cores have been analyzed from tissues obtained from occupationally exposed individuals (known fiber exposure), laboratory animals (known exposure) and individuals with no known occupational exposure. Cores of bodies have been analyzed as amosite, chrysotile, chemically degraded chrysotile and cores of undetermined nature. Amosite fibers as cores of asbestos bodies show no marked chemical degradation even after prolonged biologic residence, whereas chrysotile asbestos cores are markedly degraded. Cores of asbestos bodies from the general population, from individuals with no known exposure, may consist of degraded chrysotile, synthetic silicate fibers and, in some cases, amphibole asbestos.”  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.  We all owe a debt of gratitude to these researchers.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

California Mesothelioma Lawyer,

Mesothelioma Lawyers San Diego,

Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Attorney


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Asbestos Inhalation Nitrate Levels and Cellular Mutation

Asbestos Inhalation Nitrate Levels and Cellular Mutation

When asbestos fibers are broken into small pieces they can be swallowed or inhaled and lead to mesothelioma disease.  This disease is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people each year, and consequently is the subject of a great deal of research.  One important study is called, “Secreted extracellular domains of macrophage scavenger receptors form elongated trimers which specifically bind crocidolite asbestos” by D Resnick, N J Freedman, S Xu and M Krieger – February 15, 1993 The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 268, 3538-3545.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Macrophage scavenger receptors, which have been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis and other macrophage-mediated events, are trimeric integral membrane glycoproteins whose extracellular domains have been predicted to include alpha-helical coiled-coil, collagenous and globular structures. To elucidate further the structural and functional properties of these receptors, we generated transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells which express secreted extracellular domains of the type I and type II bovine scavenger receptors and developed a solid-phase bead-binding assay to assess their ligand-binding properties. The secreted receptors exhibited the distinctive high-affinity, broad polyanionic ligand-binding specificity and the pH dependence of binding which characterize the membrane-anchored cell-surface forms of the receptors. Both the type I and type II secreted receptors were trimeric glycoproteins comprising disulfide-linked dimers and noncovalently associated monomers. Gel filtration and glycerol-gradient centrifugation established that the type II trimers were highly elongated and did not associate into higher order oligomers at the low concentrations used in these experiments. Crocilodite asbestos, which is phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages and can cause asbestosis and mesothelioma, bound efficiently to secreted type I receptors and less well to the type II receptors. This binding was specific in that it was competed by a variety of well established scavenger receptor ligands but not by negative controls. These studies have identified a new type of insoluble scavenger receptor ligand, and have raised the possibility that scavenger receptors may play a role in mediating the physiological and pathological interactions of inspired particles with alveolar macrophages.”

A second article is called, “Mechanisms of Asbestos-induced Nitric Oxide Production by Rat Alveolar Macrophages in Inhalation and in vitro Models” by Timothy R. Quinlan, Kelly A. BeruBe, Miles P. Hacker, Douglas J. Taatjes A, Cynthia R. Timblin A, Jonathan Goldberg, Priscilla Kimberley, Patrick O’Shaughnessy, David Hemenway, Jennifer Torino, Luis A. Jimenez and Brooke T. Mossman – Free Radical Biology and Medicine Volume 24, Issue 5, 15 March 1998, Pages 778-788.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – To evaluate the contribution of reactive nitrogen species to inflammation by asbestos, Fischer 344 rats were exposed to crocidolite or chrysotile asbestos by inhalation to determine whether increases occurred in nitric oxide (NO•) metabolites from alveolar macrophages (AMs). AMs from animals inhaling asbestos showed significant elevations ( p < .05) in nitrite/nitrate levels which were ameliorated by NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (NMMA), an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity. Temporal patterns of NO• generation from AMs correlated with neutrophil influx in bronchoalveolar lavage samples after asbestos inhalation or bleomycin instillation, another model of pulmonary fibrosis. To determine the molecular mechanisms and specificity of iNOS promoter activation by asbestos, RAW 264.7 cells, a murine macrophage-like line, and AMs isolated from control rats were exposed to crocidolite asbestos in vitro. These cells showed increases in steady-state levels of iNOS mRNA in response to asbestos and more dramatic increases in both iNOS mRNA and immunoreactive protein after addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After transfection of an iNOS promoter/luciferase reporter construct, RAW 264.7 cells exposed to LPS, crocidolite asbestos and its nonfibrous analog, riebeckite, revealed increases in luciferase activity whereas cristobalite silica had no effects. Studies suggest that NO generation may be important in cell injury and inflammation by asbestos.”  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.  We all owe a debt of gratitude to these researchers.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

California Mesothelioma Lawyer,

Mesothelioma Lawyers San Diego,

Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Attorney


Article from articlesbase.com

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