Archive for the ‘Epithelioid Mesothelioma’ Category

Epithelioid Mesothelioma – Asbestos Attorneys in Los Angeles

Epithelioid Mesothelioma is a cancer whose only known cause is exposure to Asbestos. When fibers are inhaled, they can lodge in the cells of the Mesothelium, a membrane that lines the abdominal cavity, heart and lungs. Find out more about Epithelioid Mesothelioma at our website. If you have been exposed to Asbestos in the Los Angeles area, call us today to review your case at 877.622.5246 or visit kazanvideo.com.
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Mesothelioma Attorneys Asbestos Lung Cancer Lawyers

www.gorijulianlaw.com 888-362-6890 Gori Julian & Associates, PC handles asbestos lung cancer and mesothelioma cases. Contact the firm in Edwardsville, Illinois or St. Peters, Missouri for representation.
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mesothelioma treatments

For more details click here : www.mesotheliomalifeexpectancysite.com to find out more about epithelioid mesothelioma

Diagnostic Advances in Cancer Research Utilizing Raman Molecular Imaging to be Presented at USCAP

Diagnostic Advances in Cancer Research Utilizing Raman Molecular Imaging to be Presented at USCAP
PITTSBURGH, Pa. — Clinical researchers from Cornell Weil Medical School and University of Chicago Medical School will present research conducted on Raman Molecular Imaging’s ability to differentiate diagnostic dilemmas in lung and kidney tumors at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology’s 100th Annual Meeting, Feb. 26-March 4 at the Henry B.
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Mesothelioma and Surgical Tumors Explored

Mesothelioma and Surgical Tumors Explored

An interesting study is called, “Ultrastructural comparison of an adenomatoid tumor, lymphangioma, hemangioma, and Mesothelioma” by Joseph B. Marcus MD,†, Joseph A. Lynn MD, – Cancer Volume 25, Issue 1, pages 171–175, January 1970.  Here is an exerpt: “Abstract – An electron microscopic study was made comparing an adenomatoid tumor with a hemangioma, lymphangioma, and 2 mesotheliomas in an attempt to elucidate the cell of origin of the adenomatoid tumor. Using ultrastructural criteria, one could say that neither the hemangioma or lymphangioma were structurally related to the adenomatoid tumor. It was not possible to morphologically distinguish between the cells of the mesothelioma and that of the adenomatoid tumor.”

Another interesting study is called, “Phase II trial of high-dose cisplatin in patients with malignant mesothelioma.” By Mintzer DM, Kelsen D, Frimmer D, Heelan R, Gralla R. –
Cancer Treat Rep. 1985 Jun;69(6):711-2.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Twenty-five patients with advanced malignant mesothelioma were treated in a phase II trial with high-dose cisplatin (DDP). All patients had measurable or evaluable disease. Seven patients had received prior chemotherapy. DDP (120 mg/m2) with mannitol and prehydration was given every 4 weeks for two doses and then every 6 weeks. Of 24 patients evaluable for response, three had partial responses (3, 3+, and 9 months; response rate, 13%; 95% confidence limits, 4%-31%) and one had minor response. All responses occurred in previously untreated patients. High-dose DDP has modest activity in malignant mesothelioma.”

To determine whether mesothelin can assist in discriminating epithelioid mesotheliomas from lung adenocarcinomas or from other carcinomas metastatic to the serosal membranes, 55 mesotheliomas (44 epithelioid, 3 biphasic, and 8 sarcomatoid), 48 carcinomas of the lung (31 adenocarcinomas, 17 squamous carcinomas), and 86 nonpulmonary adenocarcinomas (14 ovary, 5 peritoneum, 9 endometrium, 11 pancreas, 4 stomach, 16 colon, 12 breast, 9 kidney, 4 thyroid, and 2 prostate) were investigated for mesothelin expression using the recently available 5B2 anti-mesothelin monoclonal antibody.

Another interesting study is called, “Efficacy of cisplatin-based intraperitoneal chemotherapy as treatment of malignant peritoneal Mesothelioma” by Maurie Markman and David Kelsen – Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology – Volume 118, Number 7, 547-550.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – In an effort to examine the potential clinical utility of intraperitoneal (i.p.) therapy in the management of patients with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma, 19 individuals with this disease were treated with a cisplatinbased i.p. treatment regimen. All but 1 patient also received i.p. mitomycin. The treatment was generally well tolerated, although a maximum of only four or five courses of cisplatin (100 mg/m2 every 28 days) and mitomycin (5–10 mg/treatment given 7 days after each i.p. cisplatin administration) could be administered, the treatment principally being stopped because of disease progression or catheter failure. Of 15 patients with malignant ascites, 7 (47%) experienced control of fluid reaccumulation ranging from 2 months to 73+ months (median 8 months). While the median survival for the 19 patients was only 9 months, 4 (21%) patients survived for more than 3 years from the initiation of therapy, and 2 patients are currently alive and clinically disease-free more than 5 years from the start of the i.p. treatment program. We conclude that a subset of patients with peritoneal mesothelioma, principally those with small-volume residual disease following surgical tumor debulking, can benefit from a cisplatin-based i.p. treatment strategy with control of ascites and prolonged disease-free survival.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

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Mesothelioma and Small Cell or Pleomorphic Patterns

Mesothelioma and Small Cell or Pleomorphic Patterns

Another interesting study is called, “Malignant epithelioid mesothelioma: anti-mesothelial marker expression correlates with histological pattern” by R L Attanoos, R Webb, S D Dojcinov, A R Gibbs – Histopathology Volume 39, Issue 6, pages 584–588, December 2001.  Here is an excerpt: “Malignant epithelioid mesothelioma: anti-mesothelial marker expression correlates with histological pattern – Aims: Malignant epithelioid mesothelioma shows marked cytoarchitectural diversity. The aim of the study was to evaluate how immunoreactivity with mesothelial markers related to histological pattern.

Methods and results:Ninety-two cases of malignant epithelioid mesothelioma (60 pleural, 32 peritoneal) were examined and classified as exhibiting tubulopapillary, adenomatoid, solid, small cell or pleomorphic patterns. All cases were immunohistochemically stained with thrombomodulin, calretinin, CD44H, and cytokeratin 5/6. Cases of malignant mesothelioma exhibited a number of different histological forms. Immunohistochemical expression of each mesothelial marker tested was not homogeneous across different histological patterns of malignant epithelioid mesothelioma, even within the same tumour section. Calretinin (with nuclear expression) was identified to show the highest overall sensitivity and lowest range variation in staining (67% sensitivity in small cell areas to 100% expression in pleomorphic areas). Cytokeratin 5/6 and thrombomodulin yielded similar overall sensitivity. Thrombomodulin appeared to demonstrate higher sensitivity for small cell variant tumour (83% sensitivity). A notable advantage with cytokeratin 5/6 was that expression was more diffuse in nature rather than the focal membranous elaboration seen in thrombomodulin. The widest range of staining was seen in small cell mesothelioma (83% sensitivity with thrombomodulin to 17% sensitivity with cytokeratin 5/6) and in tubulopapillary areas (90% sensitivity with calretinin to 38% sensitivity with CD44H).

Conclusions:Calretinin appears most useful and shows the highest overall sensitivity for malignant epithelioid mesothelioma, with good expression in areas displaying a tubulopapillary, adenomatoid, solid and pleomorphic pattern. For small cell mesothelioma, thrombomodulin appears to confer higher sensitivity and is advocated, in this setting, as the first line mesothelial marker. Cytokeratin 5/6 is a useful and easily interpretable mesothelial marker. CD44H is not of particular use in the diagnosis of malignant epithelioid mesothelioma. Accurate interpretation of immunohistochemistry in mesothelioma requires an awareness of the immunophenotypic heterogeneity identified in different histological forms of the tumour, and this is of particular importance in small biopsies.”

Another interesting study is called, “Serologic responses in patients with malignant mesothelioma: evidence for both public and private specificities.” By Robinson C, Callow M, Stevenson S, Scott B, Robinson BW, Lake RA – Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2000 May;22(5):550-6. – University Department of Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.  Here is an excerpt: “Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a pulmonary malignancy that appears to be immunogenic based on a large number of studies in both animals and humans. This notion is supported by our recent demonstration using Western blot analysis of immunoglobulin G antibodies reactive with a variety of autoantigens in many patients with MM. In view of the enormous potential of such antigens in early diagnosis, immunotherapy, and vaccination of at-risk individuals, it was essential to identify these antigens. We therefore applied the SEREX technique (serologic identification by recombinant expression cloning), using a serum pool from six patients as the probe against an expressed complementary DNA library derived from a cloned MM cell line. We screened over one million recombinants and obtained sequence information on eight antigens that had provoked immunoglobulin heavy chain class switching, presumably as a consequence of T-cell recognition. Six of these antigens were identifiable (U2AF[65], Siah binding protein, topoisomerase IIbeta, ZFM1, mIre1, and pendulin), and of the others, one was found as a single EST from a myotube library (Jemm-1); the other (Jemm-2) was not represented in any EST database even as a weak homolog. Consistent with our previous findings, each of the characterizable antigens would be expected to be associated with the cell nucleus. Each of the autoantibody specificities was uniquely associated with a single patient with the exception of antibodies to TOPIIbeta and U2AF(65). We found 13 of 14 (93%) patients with MM had antibodies to TOPIIbeta and two of 14 (14%) patients had antibodies to U2AF(65). The number of serum reactivities, taken as a measure of the complexity of the immune response, correlates with patient survival and with an index of systemic inflammation. These data suggest that a broader range of serologic reactivities reflects a more active host response to the presence of tumor.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

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