Posts Tagged ‘Cell’

Asbestos Cell Injury Inflammation and Fibrotic Lung Disease

Asbestos Cell Injury Inflammation and Fibrotic Lung Disease

One interesting study is called, “Approaches to prevention of asbestos-induced lung disease using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated catalase” – Journal of Free Radicals in Biology & Medicine – Volume 2, Issues 5-6, 1986, Pages 335-338 by Brooke T. Mossman, Joanne P. Marsh, David Hardwick, Rhonda Gilbert, Scot Hill, Ann Sesko, Marie Shatos, Jacqueline Doherty, Ann Weller and Michael Bergeron.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Asbestos-associated damage to cells of the respiratory tract in vitro can be prevented by the simultaneous addition of scavengers of active oxygen species to cultures. To determine if administration of scavenger enzymes to animals and humans is a plausible approach to the prevention of asbestos-induced lung disease, osmotic pumps were filled with various concentrations of PEG-coupled catalase and implanted subcutaneously into Fischer 344 rats over a 28-day period. At 3, 14, and 28 days after implantation of the pumps, the animals were evaluated for levels of catalase in serum and lung. In addition, lung tissue and lavage fluids were examined at 28 days for biochemical and morphologic indications of cell injury, inflammation, and fibrotic lung disease. At all time points examined, the administration of PEG-catalase caused a dosage-dependent increase in serum levels of catalase. The levels of lung catalase were evaluated at 28 days but not at earlier time periods. In comparison to control rats, the amounts of enzymes (lactic dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase), protein, and cells in lavage fluids from treated animals were unaltered. Moreover, the lungs showed no evidence of inflammation or fibrotic disease as determined by differential cell counts in lavage and measurement of hydroxyproline. These studies suggest that administration of PEG-catalase does not cause injury or other alterations in lung tissue and can be pursued as a feasible approach to prevention of asbestosis.”

Another study is called, “Prevalence of pleural calcification in persons exposed to asbestos dust, and in the general population in the same district” – Environmental Research – Volume 5, Issue 2, June 1972, Pages 210-216 by M. Navrátilb, a and F. Trippéb, a – Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – It is of interest whether pleural calcification is primarily the result of long years of exposure to asbestos dust or whether there are factors other than exposure to dust. We have investigated persons working for a long period in a plant processing asbestos products (chrysotile), persons without occupational exposure to dust but living in the vicinity of the plant, and consanguineous relations of patients with pleural calcifications. We have also studied a large population above the age of 40, in the district in which the plant is situated. Comparison of the groups disclosed that prevalence of pleural calcifications was closely related to opportunity for exposure to asbestos dust either occupationally or by family or neighborhood contact, as contrasted with the unexposed population. The prevalence in the group with direct or indirect asbestos exposure was 5.3, 5.8, 3.5%; whereas in the unexposed population it was 0.34%. These results indicate that asbestos is primarily responsible for pleural findings, but that some pleural disease may be the result of the other factors, still not known. The identification of other causes is hampered by the long period which need elapse from the onset of the process to the radiological appearance of the pleural change.”

Another study is called, “Malignant pleural mesothelioma caused by environmental exposure to asbestos or erionite in rural Turkey: CT findings in 84 patients” by AA Sahin, L Coplu, ZT Selcuk, M Eryilmaz, S Emri, O Akhan and YI Baris Department of Chest Diseases, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. – American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol 161, 533-537.  Here is an excerpt: “OBJECTIVE Malignant pleural mesothelioma in rural Turkey frequently results from environmental exposure to tremolite asbestos or fibrous zeolite (erionite). The aim of this study was to determine the CT features of malignant pleural mesothelioma in patients exposed to asbestos or erionite. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The CT scans of 84 patients with proved malignant pleural mesothelioma were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty patients (24%) had been exposed to erionite and 64 patients (76%) had been exposed to asbestos. The CT scans were interpreted by seven observers who did not know the clinical or pathologic findings. RESULTS. CT scans showed either unilateral pleural thickening or pleural nodules/masses in all patients. Pleural nodules were present in 25 patients (30%) and pleural masses in 44 patients (52%). Pleural effusion was found in 61 patients (73%), mediastinal pleural involvement in 78 (93%), pleural calcifications in 52 (62%), involvement of the interlobar fissures in 64 (76%), and volume contraction in 61 (73%). Reduced size of the hemithorax was significantly correlated with chest wall involvement. On the basis of CT findings, the preassigned staging was changed in 21 patients (25%), including 44% of the patients with disease that had been classified as stage I. CT findings were not significantly different between the patients exposed to erionite and those exposed to asbestos. CONCLUSION. The most common CT findings in cases of malignant pleural mesothelioma were unilateral pleural thickening or pleural nodules/masses with or without effusion. CT provided valuable information on the extent of the disease, which was important for staging. Although the CT features are not pathognomonic, they provide valuable clues to the diagnosis in patients who have been exposed to mineral fibers.”
 
If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.  We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please visit the following links:

Mesothelioma Lawyer

Mesothelioma Lawyer

Mesothelioma Lawyer

 


Article from articlesbase.com

Small Cell Lung Cancer Stages

Small Cell Lung Cancer Stages

There is even a dedicated US government web-page for this alone, as well as other websites which list current trails and give other relevant information.

Small Cell Lung Cancer Stages

There are always new drugs and procedures being tested for mesothelioma, so clinical trails are usually available at a variety of medical centers. Any trail can carry potential risks as well as the potential benefits so it is of course vital for anyone suffering from the disease to get the very best possible diagnosis and explanation of all the details of the trial and how it affects their particular condition.

It is often necessary to travel to where the particular trial is taking place. Travel expenses associated with the disease is one of the areas which can usually be legally claimed for, along with care given even if not paid for.

Different trials will have different eligibility requirements. For example, some trials will only take a patient who has been unsuccessful with other treatments where as other trials might only take a patient who has had no treatment at all.

Lung Cancer Secrets Revealed Click here

Some trials are randomized which means that some of the patients will receive the new treatment and some will receive the current “standard” treatment, but placebos (pills which contain no active ingredient, in order to eliminate the patients expectations from the results) are rarely used in cancer trials.

Trials often occur in phases. Phase one typically involves only a small number of patients to test how the new drugs or treatments should be administered. Then Phase 2 gives initial data on the results of the trial, including side effects. Then Phase 3 will compare the trial treatment with existing treatments with large numbers of patients involved.

Not all trials are fully covered by all types of medical insurance, so be sure to check how a particular trial will effect you financially.

Mesothelioma clinical trials can be a valuable option for some patients, but be sure to check all the details first.

lung cancer treatment breakthroughs Click here

Mesothelioma and Small Cell or Pleomorphic Patterns

Mesothelioma and Small Cell or Pleomorphic Patterns

Another interesting study is called, “Malignant epithelioid mesothelioma: anti-mesothelial marker expression correlates with histological pattern” by R L Attanoos, R Webb, S D Dojcinov, A R Gibbs – Histopathology Volume 39, Issue 6, pages 584–588, December 2001.  Here is an excerpt: “Malignant epithelioid mesothelioma: anti-mesothelial marker expression correlates with histological pattern – Aims: Malignant epithelioid mesothelioma shows marked cytoarchitectural diversity. The aim of the study was to evaluate how immunoreactivity with mesothelial markers related to histological pattern.

Methods and results:Ninety-two cases of malignant epithelioid mesothelioma (60 pleural, 32 peritoneal) were examined and classified as exhibiting tubulopapillary, adenomatoid, solid, small cell or pleomorphic patterns. All cases were immunohistochemically stained with thrombomodulin, calretinin, CD44H, and cytokeratin 5/6. Cases of malignant mesothelioma exhibited a number of different histological forms. Immunohistochemical expression of each mesothelial marker tested was not homogeneous across different histological patterns of malignant epithelioid mesothelioma, even within the same tumour section. Calretinin (with nuclear expression) was identified to show the highest overall sensitivity and lowest range variation in staining (67% sensitivity in small cell areas to 100% expression in pleomorphic areas). Cytokeratin 5/6 and thrombomodulin yielded similar overall sensitivity. Thrombomodulin appeared to demonstrate higher sensitivity for small cell variant tumour (83% sensitivity). A notable advantage with cytokeratin 5/6 was that expression was more diffuse in nature rather than the focal membranous elaboration seen in thrombomodulin. The widest range of staining was seen in small cell mesothelioma (83% sensitivity with thrombomodulin to 17% sensitivity with cytokeratin 5/6) and in tubulopapillary areas (90% sensitivity with calretinin to 38% sensitivity with CD44H).

Conclusions:Calretinin appears most useful and shows the highest overall sensitivity for malignant epithelioid mesothelioma, with good expression in areas displaying a tubulopapillary, adenomatoid, solid and pleomorphic pattern. For small cell mesothelioma, thrombomodulin appears to confer higher sensitivity and is advocated, in this setting, as the first line mesothelial marker. Cytokeratin 5/6 is a useful and easily interpretable mesothelial marker. CD44H is not of particular use in the diagnosis of malignant epithelioid mesothelioma. Accurate interpretation of immunohistochemistry in mesothelioma requires an awareness of the immunophenotypic heterogeneity identified in different histological forms of the tumour, and this is of particular importance in small biopsies.”

Another interesting study is called, “Serologic responses in patients with malignant mesothelioma: evidence for both public and private specificities.” By Robinson C, Callow M, Stevenson S, Scott B, Robinson BW, Lake RA – Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2000 May;22(5):550-6. – University Department of Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.  Here is an excerpt: “Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a pulmonary malignancy that appears to be immunogenic based on a large number of studies in both animals and humans. This notion is supported by our recent demonstration using Western blot analysis of immunoglobulin G antibodies reactive with a variety of autoantigens in many patients with MM. In view of the enormous potential of such antigens in early diagnosis, immunotherapy, and vaccination of at-risk individuals, it was essential to identify these antigens. We therefore applied the SEREX technique (serologic identification by recombinant expression cloning), using a serum pool from six patients as the probe against an expressed complementary DNA library derived from a cloned MM cell line. We screened over one million recombinants and obtained sequence information on eight antigens that had provoked immunoglobulin heavy chain class switching, presumably as a consequence of T-cell recognition. Six of these antigens were identifiable (U2AF[65], Siah binding protein, topoisomerase IIbeta, ZFM1, mIre1, and pendulin), and of the others, one was found as a single EST from a myotube library (Jemm-1); the other (Jemm-2) was not represented in any EST database even as a weak homolog. Consistent with our previous findings, each of the characterizable antigens would be expected to be associated with the cell nucleus. Each of the autoantibody specificities was uniquely associated with a single patient with the exception of antibodies to TOPIIbeta and U2AF(65). We found 13 of 14 (93%) patients with MM had antibodies to TOPIIbeta and two of 14 (14%) patients had antibodies to U2AF(65). The number of serum reactivities, taken as a measure of the complexity of the immune response, correlates with patient survival and with an index of systemic inflammation. These data suggest that a broader range of serologic reactivities reflects a more active host response to the presence of tumor.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

Depuy Hip Recall Lawsuit

Depuy Hip Recall Lawsuit

Depuy Hip Recall Florida

 


Article from articlesbase.com

Inhibited Cell Growth and Asbestos Concentrations

Inhibited Cell Growth and Asbestos Concentrations

Inhibited Cell Growth and Asbestos Concentrations


Free Online Articles Directory





Why Submit Articles?
Top Authors
Top Articles
FAQ
AB Answers

Publish Article

0 && $ .browser.msie ) {
var ie_version = parseInt($ .browser.version);
if(ie_version Hello Guest
Login


Login via


Register
Hello
My Home
Sign Out

Email

Password


Remember me?
Lost Password?

Home Page > Health > Cancer > Inhibited Cell Growth and Asbestos Concentrations

Inhibited Cell Growth and Asbestos Concentrations

Edit Article |

Posted: Sep 12, 2010 |Comments: 0

|

Share

]]>

Ask a question

Ask our experts your Cancer related questions here…200 Characters left

Related Questions

How many law firms are there in the us ?
Need a good Litigation lawyer over a disputed contract of an ex-partner bringing suit against me
In 2005 I had a melanoma removed. Can I use hcg after having cancer. I understand that even if I have a cell that isn’t causing a problem that adding a growth hormone could make it go other places
A lawyer told me if a creditor/law firm wants to be mean along with wage garnishment they can take our household stuff even the family pet if it is deemed vaulable how true is this please explain

Syndicate this Article

Copy to clipboard

Inhibited Cell Growth and Asbestos Concentrations

By: Montwrobleski77

About the Author

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please visit the following links

Depuy Hip Recall

Depuy Hip Replacement Recall

Depuy Hip Replacement Recall

 

 

(ArticlesBase SC #3251615)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Inhibited Cell Growth and Asbestos Concentrations





Mesothelioma deaths among workers is a sad part of this country’s history.  However, there is some important research being done regarding asbestos and its complications.
One interesting study is called, “Asbestos-induced sister chromatid exchanges in cultured Chinese hamster ovarian fibroblast cells.” By Livingston GK, Rom WN, Morris MV. – J Environ Pathol Toxicol. 1980 Sep;4(2-3):373-82.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Asbestos fibers were tested for possible mutagenic activity using the Fluorescent Plus Giemsa (FPG) sister chromatid exchange (SCE) technique. Amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile fibers were added to cell cultures at final concentrations of 10 and 100 micrograms/ml. Chrysotile completely inhibited cell growth at both concentrations; cells exposed to amosite and crocidolite proliferated but only at the lower concentration. Crocidolite significantly elevated the SCE rate and larger (greater than 5 mu) chromosomes were most sensitive. Amosite appeared to have a lesser effect on SCE frequency. Asbestos fibers are capable of disturbing cellular processes associated with chromosomal stability and effects vary with the asbestos type.”

Another interesting study is called, “Mesothelioma among employees with likely contact with in-place asbestos-containing building materials.” By Anderson HA, Hanrahan LP, Schirmer J, Higgins D, Sarow P. – Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – The occurrence of mesothelioma is a sentinel event in occupational and environmental disease. A mesothelioma surveillance system was established utilizing existing computerized Wisconsin vital statistics data maintained since 1959 and a Cancer Reporting System (CRS) established in 1978. Review of the death certificate listing of usual occupation and industry from 487 mesothelioma deaths in Wisconsin from 1959 to 1989 led to the investigation of 41 persons with likely exposure to inplace asbestos-containing building materials (ACBM): 12 school teachers, 10 school maintenance employees, 7 public building maintenance workers, 5 private building maintenance workers, and 7 commercial and factory workers performing maintenance activities. For 10 (34%) of the 29 maintenance workers the only source of asbestos exposure identified was their maintenance work. For five (17%) histories indicated some prior employment in occupations and industries with probable asbestos exposures. Opportunities for indirect occupational exposure were identified for ten who had been employed in the residential construction industry. One maintenance worker was exposed to asbestos in the household and another had neighborhood exposure. For 9 (75%) of the school teachers, the only identifiable potential source of asbestos exposure was derived from in-place ACBM in schools. One teacher had spent a season in the merchant marine aboard an iron ore-hauling ship and 2 had worked in the residential construction industry. Two of the teachers were sisters, and in two instances, two teachers had taught in the same school facility. We conclude that individuals occupationally exposed to in-place ACBM are at risk for the subsequent development of mesothelioma.”

Another interesting study is called, “Predictions of mortality from pleural mesothelioma in Italy: A model based on asbestos consumption figures supports results from age-period-cohort models” – International Journal of Cancer – Volume 115, Issue 1, pages 142–147, 20 May 2005.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Italy was the second main asbestos producer in Europe, after the Soviet Union, until the end of the 1980s, and raw asbestos was imported on a large scale until 1992. The Italian pattern of asbestos consumption lags on average about 10 years behind the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom and the Nordic countries. Measures to reduce exposure were introduced in the mid-1970s in some workplaces. In 1986, limitations were imposed on the use of crocidolite and in 1992 asbestos was definitively banned. We have used primary pleural cancer mortality figures (1970–1999) to predict mortality from mesothelioma among Italian men in the next 30 years by age-cohort-period models and by a model based on asbestos consumption figures. The pleural cancer/mesothelioma ratio and mesothelioma misdiagnosis in the past were taken into account in the analysis. Estimated risks of birth cohorts born after 1945 decrease less quickly in Italy than in other Western countries. The findings predict a peak with about 800 mesothelioma annual deaths in the period 2012–2024. Results estimated using age-period-cohort models were similar to those obtained from the asbestos consumption model.”

 We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers for their important work.  If you found any of these excerpts helpful, please read the studies in their entirety.

Retrieved from “http://www.articlesbase.com/cancer-articles/inhibited-cell-growth-and-asbestos-concentrations-3251615.html

(ArticlesBase SC #3251615)

Montwrobleski77 -
About the Author:

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please visit the following links

Depuy Hip Recall

Depuy Hip Replacement Recall

Depuy Hip Replacement Recall

 

 

]]>

Rate this Article

1
2
3
4
5

vote(s)
0 vote(s)

Feedback
RSS
Print
Email
Re-Publish

Source:  http://www.articlesbase.com/cancer-articles/inhibited-cell-growth-and-asbestos-concentrations-3251615.html

Article Tags:
asbestos exposure, mesothelioma cancer, asbestos attorney, lawyer, class action lawyers, law suit, suite, law firm, law firms, litigation, treatment, lung cancer, patients, victims, meso lawyer, faq, navy veterans, symptoms, asbestos poisoning, damage, pl

Related Videos

Related Articles

Latest Cancer Articles
More from Montwrobleski77


Dr David Sanderson Explain Mesothelioma

Dr. David Sanderson describes mesothelioma and explains how asbestos contributes to lung cancer. (01:39)


Asbestos Poisoning

Dr. Travis Stork details how asbestos enters the lungs and contaminates the lungs. (01:30)


Tampon Myth and Truth

Are certain tampons dangerous to your health? Editor-in-chief of Prevention, Liz Vaccariello, joins The Doctors to answer the question of whether tampons contain asbestos or dioxin, two highly toxic compounds. (02:03)


Rachel Maines’ Unexpected Insights

Rachel Maines, technology historian talks about the most fascinating insight to emerge from her current research. (02:59)


Learn about the Gasket – Definition and Purpose

The video source is howautowork.com.it is about gasket definition,purpose generally to prevent leakage between the two objects while under compression,manufacturing materials,brass,alloy,and more . (02:57)

Upper Lobe Tumors and Asbestos Exposure

Deaths due to mesothelioma could have been avoided

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Aug 21, 2010

Premature Death of Workers Caused by Asbestos Exposure and Mesothelioma

Spreading the word about asbestos related disease is the first step towards finding a cure

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Aug 21, 2010

Parenchymal Abnormalities Asbestos Exposure and Disease Development

Asbestos disease is deadly and more common than you think

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Sep 05, 2010

Peritoneal Mesothelioma Patients Generally Present with Two Types of Symptoms

Aberrant activation and upregulation of the Wnt pathway is a key feature of many cancers

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 02, 2010

Peripheral Tumours Mesothelioma Disease Development and Asbestos Exposure

The majority of cases with asbestos-related diseases had experienced their first asbestos exposure prior to 1960. For cases with first asbestos exposure after 1960, a shift was observed from the primary asbestos industry towards asbestos-using industries

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Sep 20, 2010

Asbestos Exposure and Ferruginous Bodies in the Lungs

Asbestos has been documented as a contaminant of some older cosmetic talc preparations, the chrysotile and crocidolite types of asbestos are more indicative of background and occupational exposure

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Sep 19, 2010

Asbestos Exposure and Human Mesothelioma Cell Lines

Recently two antifolate-based combinations with apparently higher efficacy than older regimens have emerged: the pemetrexed/cisplatin regimen and the raltitrexed/oxaliplatin regimen

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 22, 2010

Mean Durations of Asbestos Exposure and Chest Abnormalities

It is believed that a program of medical awareness should be instituted in work areas where people are employed in the mining, processing and use of asbestos

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Sep 19, 2010

Mesothelioma Treatment

This article gives a brief description of Mesothelioma, and discusses treatment options

By:
Mikasl

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 07, 2010

Influences of environmental chemicals on breast cancer

For millions of women whose lives have been affected by breast cancer, the 1994 discovery of the first breast cancer gene by researchers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) was a welcome sign of progress in the fight against this dreaded disease. Statistics tell us that breast cancer is still a major health concern for women everywhere. More women in INDIA are living with breast cancer than with any other non-skin cancer.

By:
Dr.R.Uma Ranil

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 07, 2010

You can’t escape disease unless you have this

Sir / Madam Let’s face it. No one in this country – not you, me, or anyone else in the world, for that matter — is unaffected by disease. Some of us have suffered from disease ourselves, and practically every one of us has a loved one who is (or has been) a victim of a devastating disease — or even died from it.

By:
Januszl

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 07, 2010

Do you or a loved one suffer from Lung Cancer

Compensation is already being recovered on behalf of thousands of patients and families of those exposed to asbestos and diagnosed with lung cancer. Contact our legal team before it’s too late

By:
Mahmoud Hamdyl

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 06, 2010

Breast Cancer Ribbon

Breast cancer are all breast cancers that afflict the human body. Several rare types of cancer of the breast can strike people as well. Invasive, or infiltrating, ductal carcinoma is the most common, making up 70 percent of all breast cancer cases. For awareness in women the Breast Cancer Ribbon is used. This ribbon is in pink color.

By:
Muqeet Somrol

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 05, 2010

What do you need to know about Mesothelioma Lawyers in San Diego

In this article you will discover all what you want to know about mesothelioma attorneys san diego and asbestos attorney illinois

By:
HOUDA barbechl

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 05, 2010

Can Yogurt Fight Gastrointestinal Ulcers?

Can Yogurt Fight Gastrointestinal Ulcers? Can Yogurt Fight Gastrointestinal Ulcers?

By:
Biylings Farwortl

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 05, 2010

Advantages and Disadvantages of a PET CT Scan

A PET scan and a CT scan work together to provide a detailed image of a person’s body. They are used together to help detect and locate abnormalities or cancerous cells. This article describes not only what the scans do and how they work in more detail, but it also provides information about the advantages and disadvantages of a PET CT scan. Read on to find out more about a PET CT scan.

By:
Kathryn Dawsonl

Health>
Cancerl
Nov 04, 2010

Mesothelioma Therapy with the Antiestrogen Tamoxifen

Therapy with the antiestrogen tamoxifen in this setting may provide an option for long-term medical management in cases of symptomatic recurrent cystic mesotheliomas

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 28, 2010

Mesothelioma and Histological Evidence of Extra Pleural Lymph Node Metastases

Pathological nodal involvement cannot be predicted from nodal dimensions. These data suggest that all patients being considered for radical resection of MPM should preferentially undergo preoperative cervical mediastinoscopy irrespective of radiological findings

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 28, 2010

Do Markers Provide Higher Diagnostic Accuracy for Mesothelioma

Various antibody panels have been recommended for the diagnosis of MM, with no overall consensus about how many and which markers should be used. A recent study with Bayesian statistics has demonstrated that the use of many markers does not provide higher diagnostic accuracy than the use of selected single antibodies or various combinations of only 2 markers

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 28, 2010

Mesothelioma and Effects of Epigenetic and Genetic Alterations

Although the association between TSP-1 and VEGF has not been well defined, the effect of VEGF should be considered when attempting to determine the impact of TSP-1 on prognosis

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 28, 2010

Mesothelioma Cell Lines Using Indirect Immunofluorescence and Northern Blotting

Many controversial issues still exist in the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. In the ensuing years newer staging systems, better preoperative staging, newer experimental therapies, and the localization of patients at expert centers will undoubtedly have an impact on disease management.

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 27, 2010

Mesothelioma and Continuous Infusion Paclitaxel Administered with Large Field Irradiation

Together with identification of the antigen in serum, pleural fluid, or ascitic fluid, immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical techniques for detecting carcinoembryonic antigen provide a valuable aid for distinguishing malignant mesothelioma from metastatic carcinomas.

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 27, 2010

Mesothelioma Multimodality Approach with CAP Chemotherapy

The use of extrapleural pneumonectomy in a multimodality treatment setting for malignant pleural mesothelioma is described, presenting first the right-sided approach and then the left-sided. This technique used in a multimodality approach with CAP chemotherapy.

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 27, 2010

Mesothelioma and Murine Models of Melanoma and Adenocarcinoma

There is good evidence to recommend chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin for adult patients with symptomatic advanced malignant pleural mesothelioma. Such treatment should be administered with supplementation of vitamin B12 and folic acid

By:
Montwrobleski77l

Health>
Cancerl
Oct 27, 2010

Add new Comment

Your Name: *

Your Email:

Comment Body: *

 

Verification code:*

* Required fields

Submit

Your Articles Here
It’s Free and easy

Sign Up Today

Author Navigation

My Home
Publish Article
View/Edit Articles
View/Edit Q&A
Edit your Account
Manage Authors
Statistics Page
Personal RSS Builder

My Home
Edit your Account
Update Profile
View/Edit Q&A
Publish Article
Author Box


Montwrobleski77 has 234 articles online

Contact Author

Subscribe to RSS

Print article

Send to friend

Re-Publish article

Articles Categories
All Categories

Advertising
Arts & Entertainment
Automotive
Beauty
Business
Careers
Computers
Education
Finance
Food and Beverage
Health
Hobbies
Home and Family
Home Improvement
Internet
Judaism
Law
Marketing
News and Society
Relationships
Self Improvement
Shopping
Spirituality
Sports and Fitness
Technology
Travel
Writing

Health

Acne
Allergies
Alternative Medicine
Anti Aging
Cancer
Dental Care
Disabilities
Diseases and Conditions
Hair Loss
Hearing
Medical Tourism
Medicine
Men’s Health
Mental Health
Nutrition
Plastic Surgeries
Quit Smoking
Sleep
Supplements & Vitamins
Vision
Wellness
Women’s Health

]]>

Need Help?
Contact Us
FAQ
Submit Articles
Editorial Guidelines
Blog

Site Links
Recent Articles
Top Authors
Top Articles
Find Articles
Site Map

Webmasters
RSS Builder
RSS
Link to Us

Business Info
Advertising

Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the Terms Of Use and Privacy Policy | User published content is licensed under a Creative Commons License.
Copyright © 2005-2010 Free Articles by ArticlesBase.com, All rights reserved.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please visit the following links

Depuy Hip Recall

Depuy Hip Replacement Recall

Depuy Hip Replacement Recall

 

 


Article from articlesbase.com

More Mesothelioma Deaths Articles

Mesothelioma Cancer Cell Types – Epithelioid, Sarcomatoid & Biphasic

Mesothelioma Cancer Cell Types – Epithelioid, Sarcomatoid & Biphasic

Mesothelioma is one of the deadliest cancers for a number of reasons. It has a prolonged latency period during which it destroys the mucous-producing membrane that lines the outer surface of a number of organs. This membrane allows the organs to move, which in turn allows them to function. Over a period of decades mesothelioma destroys healthy cells by assaulting them with three main avenues of attack: epithelioid, sarcomatoid, biphasic cells.

Epithelioid mesothelioma cells are the most common and relatively easiest to treat of all types of mesothelioma. This type of cell appears to be a papillary or tubular growth that usually affects the outer membranes and linings of the internal organs and other bodily surfaces. Somewhere between 50 and 70% of all mesothelioma cases belong to this category, and although this cancer is usually extremely difficult to treat, epithelioid mesothelioma is the most likely to respond to treatment.

The second type of mesothelioma is sarcomatoid mesothelioma. This type is the most serious form of the disease, as it is the least likely to respond to treatment. These spindle-shaped pattern of cells that appear to overlap each other are also fortunately the rarest type of the cancer, with approximately 10-20% of all mesothelioma cases falling into this type. Sarcomatoid mesothelioma is so dangerous because it attacks and arises from the support tissues of the body, such as bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle, and cancers in these areas are notoriously difficult and painful to treat. Patients with this form of cancer rarely live longer than six months after diagnosis.

The final condition, biphasic mesothelioma, is not an independent type of mesothelioma, but a combination of sarcomatoid and epithelioid. It is also a mixed bag of conditions in that it can take the good and bad aspects of the other two types, and almost 20-35% of all mesothelioma cases fall into either mixed or biphasic areas.

Without a doubt, mesothelioma is one of the most devastating types of cancer. Most people rarely live beyond a year after their initial diagnosis, and few victims reach five years. Mesothelioma is almost always caused by asbestos exposure, and millions of people have had contact with this deadly substance.

http://1mesothelioma1.blogspot.com

http://article-lovers.blogspot.com

http://damn-i-hate-acne.blogspot.com


Article from articlesbase.com

Categories