Posts Tagged ‘Disease’

What are the typical injuries and illnesses that are claimed for in workplace accidents and industrial disease claims?

What are the typical injuries and illnesses that are claimed for in workplace accidents and industrial disease claims?

Many personal injury claims arise where individuals have developed an illness or suffered injury as a result of substandard working conditions. According to the Health and Safety Executive, in 2009/10 there were 1.3m people suffering from an illness they believed was caused or worsened by their existing job or past work. During the same period, 26,061 reported injuries to employees were classified as major injuries, particularly falls from heights.

Employers have a legal duty under health and safety legislation to ensure their employees’ health, safety and welfare are protected in the workplace – but industrial disease and injury remains a major issue.

Workplace injuries

Industrial injuries commonly occur on construction sites and in factories but can happen in other workplaces such as restaurants, for example. Common workplace accidents that may give rise to an industrial personal injury claim include:

. Construction or warehouse accidents: these can cause serious injuries to head, back and limbs through a lack of training and or supervision.
. Factory accidents: typical injuries can include trapped fingers or limbs, falls and cuts, burns, and back injuries.
. Heavy machinery/equipment based accidents: a wide range of injuries could occur including cuts and burns, fractures, and serious injuries such as loss of limbs.
. Office accidents: these usually cause relatively minor injuries however back injuries and fractures may easily occur when for instance, carrying heavy files or inadequate office seating.

Essentially the workplace, if not made appropriately safe for employees to work, can be a dangerous place and there is always the possibility that someone will be injured, leading to a personal injury claim against an employer.

Industrial diseases
There are many types of industrial illnesses, the most common including asbestosis and mesothelioma caused by exposure to asbestos dust and skin diseases and conditions caused by different types of chemical irritants.

Other industrial diseases or conditions that may give rise to a compensation claim include:

. Deafness: a worker may be able to claim for permanent or partial hearing loss caused by exposure to industrial noise during the course of his work. Claims may also be made for cases of tinnitus.
. Musculoskeletal disorders: conditions of joints, muscles and tendons such as arthritis and back pain, vibration white finger and repetitive strain injury. They can develop through working on repetitive production lines that involve repeated rapid movements over a long period of time or may be caused by using machines such as pneumatic drills.
. Lung disease: caused by coal mine dust, and dust factories and foundries. The onset of asthma and bronchitis may also be a cause to consider making a personal injury claim.
. Cancer: caused by exposure to various types of carcinogens such as chemicals and dyes, wood dust and high levels of synthetic chemicals.
. Brain diseases: neurological illnesses may be caused by solvents in the workplace.

If you or a relative have been injured or have developed an illness that may have been caused during the course of employment with an organisation, it is important to take expert legal advice on whether or not you have a valid personal injury claim.

If you have had an accident and it wasn’t your fault then you could be entitled to file accident claims to ensure you get the right compensation for your injuries and suffering. If you have a legitimate accident at work claim then get in touch with the best legal advice available.


Article from articlesbase.com

Find More Mesothelioma Causes Articles

Exploring the Use of Antioxidant Scavengers and Mesothelioma Asbestos Disease

Exploring the Use of Antioxidant Scavengers and Mesothelioma Asbestos Disease

Comparing and contrasting the various research into Mesothelioma disease brings some startling results.  One interesting study is called, “Oxygen radicals and asbestos-mediated disease.” By T R Quinlan, J P Marsh, Y M Janssen, P A Borm, and B T Mossman – Environ Health Perspect. 1994 December; 102(Suppl 10): 107–110.  Here is an excerpt: ” Abstract – Asbestos fibers are potent elaborators of active oxygen species whether by reactions involving iron on the surface of the fiber, or by attempted phagocytosis of fibers by cell types resident in the lung. The link between production of active oxygen species and the pathogenesis of asbestos-mediated disease has been highlighted by studies outlined here exploring the use of antioxidant scavengers which inhibit the cytotoxic effects of asbestos both in vitro and in vivo. The use of antioxidant enzymes ameliorates the induction of certain genes necessary for cell proliferation, such as ornithine decarboxylase, implicating oxidants as causative factors in some abnormal cell replicative events. Based on these observations, antioxidant enzymes likely represent an important lung defense mechanism in response to oxidative stress. In addition, their gene expression in lung or in cells from bronchoalveolar lavage might be a valuable biomarker of chronic inflammation and pulmonary disease after inhalation of oxidants.”

Another interesting study is called, “Radiographic abnormalities in asbestos insulators: Effects of duration from onset of exposure and smoking. Relationships of dyspnea with parenchymal and pleural fibrosis” by R. Lilis MD, A. Miller MD, J. Godbold PhD, E. Chan MS, I. J. Selikoff MD – American Journal of Industrial Medicine volume 20, issue 1, pages 1-15- 1991 – here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Chest radiographs and spirometry were evaluated in 2,907 active and retired asbestos insulators; most (86.8%) had ≥ 30 years from onset of asbestos exposure. Testing was performed in 19 cities in the United States during 1981–1983. Complete demographic, smoking, clinical, and radiologic data were obtained for 2,790 workers. This is the largest single group of insulators that has been studied. Five hundred forty-eight (19.7%) had never smoked cigarettes, 942 (33.9%) were current cigarette smokers, and 1,300 (46.6%) were ex-smokers. Only 439 (15.7%) workers had no radiographic evidence of asbestos-related disease (normal chest X-ray); 668 (23.9%) had pleural fibrosis only, 325 (11.6%) had parenchymal fibrosis alone, and 1,358 (48.7%) had both parenchymal and pleural fibrosis. The prevalence of radiographic parenchymal changes increased significantly (p < .001) from 38.6% (DURONSET < 30 years) to 70% (≥40 years). For pleural changes the comparative prevalences were 55% and 82%. Those with no history of cigarette smoking were more likely to have normal filMS than those with a history of smoking (19.2% versus 14.4% for current smokers and 15.2% among ex-smokers), and were less likely to have parenchymal fibrosis (44.5% versus 69.7% for current smokers and 60.2% of ex-smokers). Dyspnea, MRC grade 3 and higher, was more prevalent when pleural fibrosis was associated with interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (at all profusion levels of small opacities) than when pleural fibrosis was absent. Logistic regression analysis of factors contributing to such dyspnea showed that the presence of combined parenchymal and pleural abnormalities was a significant explanatory variable, in addition to age, smoking, and body mass (Quetelet index); the presence of parenchymal changes only or of pleural changes only, as factors contributing to dyspnea, did not reach the level of statistical significance in the regression analysis. The results of these examinations show that pleural fibrosis is a frequent finding in asbestos-exposed groups with long-term follow-up and that its functional significance is not negligible. The contribution of cigarette smoking to prevalence and severity of interstitial fibrosis is an additional reason for smoking cessation among asbestos-exposed individuals.”

A third study is called, “Asbestos: a chronology of its origins and health effects.” By R Murray – Br J Ind Med 1990;47:361-365.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – The emotionalised subject of asbestos is treated in chronological terms: how the “magic mineral” known in ancient times in Europe and Asia became in the late nineteenth century an important industrial resource of particular interest to the navies of the world; and how its malign effects gradually became apparent during the present century. The media have made asbestos a notorious villain, but it still has properties and applications useful to society if they are properly controlled in the same way as other industrial hazards. One important application is the manufacture of asbestos cement pipes which are a convenient and cheap method of providing water supplies and sewage disposal for developing countries. An appeal is made for prudence and not hysteria in relation to the use of mineral fibres of all types.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers for their important work.  If you found any of these excerpts helpful, please read the studies in their entirety.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please click on the following links

Depuy Hip Recall

Depuy Hip Lawsuit

Mesothelioma Lawyer

 


Article from articlesbase.com

Asbestos Cell Injury Inflammation and Fibrotic Lung Disease

Asbestos Cell Injury Inflammation and Fibrotic Lung Disease

One interesting study is called, “Approaches to prevention of asbestos-induced lung disease using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated catalase” – Journal of Free Radicals in Biology & Medicine – Volume 2, Issues 5-6, 1986, Pages 335-338 by Brooke T. Mossman, Joanne P. Marsh, David Hardwick, Rhonda Gilbert, Scot Hill, Ann Sesko, Marie Shatos, Jacqueline Doherty, Ann Weller and Michael Bergeron.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Asbestos-associated damage to cells of the respiratory tract in vitro can be prevented by the simultaneous addition of scavengers of active oxygen species to cultures. To determine if administration of scavenger enzymes to animals and humans is a plausible approach to the prevention of asbestos-induced lung disease, osmotic pumps were filled with various concentrations of PEG-coupled catalase and implanted subcutaneously into Fischer 344 rats over a 28-day period. At 3, 14, and 28 days after implantation of the pumps, the animals were evaluated for levels of catalase in serum and lung. In addition, lung tissue and lavage fluids were examined at 28 days for biochemical and morphologic indications of cell injury, inflammation, and fibrotic lung disease. At all time points examined, the administration of PEG-catalase caused a dosage-dependent increase in serum levels of catalase. The levels of lung catalase were evaluated at 28 days but not at earlier time periods. In comparison to control rats, the amounts of enzymes (lactic dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase), protein, and cells in lavage fluids from treated animals were unaltered. Moreover, the lungs showed no evidence of inflammation or fibrotic disease as determined by differential cell counts in lavage and measurement of hydroxyproline. These studies suggest that administration of PEG-catalase does not cause injury or other alterations in lung tissue and can be pursued as a feasible approach to prevention of asbestosis.”

Another study is called, “Prevalence of pleural calcification in persons exposed to asbestos dust, and in the general population in the same district” – Environmental Research – Volume 5, Issue 2, June 1972, Pages 210-216 by M. Navrátilb, a and F. Trippéb, a – Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – It is of interest whether pleural calcification is primarily the result of long years of exposure to asbestos dust or whether there are factors other than exposure to dust. We have investigated persons working for a long period in a plant processing asbestos products (chrysotile), persons without occupational exposure to dust but living in the vicinity of the plant, and consanguineous relations of patients with pleural calcifications. We have also studied a large population above the age of 40, in the district in which the plant is situated. Comparison of the groups disclosed that prevalence of pleural calcifications was closely related to opportunity for exposure to asbestos dust either occupationally or by family or neighborhood contact, as contrasted with the unexposed population. The prevalence in the group with direct or indirect asbestos exposure was 5.3, 5.8, 3.5%; whereas in the unexposed population it was 0.34%. These results indicate that asbestos is primarily responsible for pleural findings, but that some pleural disease may be the result of the other factors, still not known. The identification of other causes is hampered by the long period which need elapse from the onset of the process to the radiological appearance of the pleural change.”

Another study is called, “Malignant pleural mesothelioma caused by environmental exposure to asbestos or erionite in rural Turkey: CT findings in 84 patients” by AA Sahin, L Coplu, ZT Selcuk, M Eryilmaz, S Emri, O Akhan and YI Baris Department of Chest Diseases, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. – American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol 161, 533-537.  Here is an excerpt: “OBJECTIVE Malignant pleural mesothelioma in rural Turkey frequently results from environmental exposure to tremolite asbestos or fibrous zeolite (erionite). The aim of this study was to determine the CT features of malignant pleural mesothelioma in patients exposed to asbestos or erionite. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The CT scans of 84 patients with proved malignant pleural mesothelioma were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty patients (24%) had been exposed to erionite and 64 patients (76%) had been exposed to asbestos. The CT scans were interpreted by seven observers who did not know the clinical or pathologic findings. RESULTS. CT scans showed either unilateral pleural thickening or pleural nodules/masses in all patients. Pleural nodules were present in 25 patients (30%) and pleural masses in 44 patients (52%). Pleural effusion was found in 61 patients (73%), mediastinal pleural involvement in 78 (93%), pleural calcifications in 52 (62%), involvement of the interlobar fissures in 64 (76%), and volume contraction in 61 (73%). Reduced size of the hemithorax was significantly correlated with chest wall involvement. On the basis of CT findings, the preassigned staging was changed in 21 patients (25%), including 44% of the patients with disease that had been classified as stage I. CT findings were not significantly different between the patients exposed to erionite and those exposed to asbestos. CONCLUSION. The most common CT findings in cases of malignant pleural mesothelioma were unilateral pleural thickening or pleural nodules/masses with or without effusion. CT provided valuable information on the extent of the disease, which was important for staging. Although the CT features are not pathognomonic, they provide valuable clues to the diagnosis in patients who have been exposed to mineral fibers.”
 
If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.  We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please visit the following links:

Mesothelioma Lawyer

Mesothelioma Lawyer

Mesothelioma Lawyer

 


Article from articlesbase.com

Cancer Mesothelioma Disease – San Diego, San Francisco Laws

www.KazanVideo.com If you have cancer mesothelioma disease in San Diego or San Francisco, you deserve to know your options for legal support and representation. Mesothelioma patients can count on Kazan Law for mesothelioma facts, mesothelioma survival information, watch this informative video or call 877.622.5246 to learn more about cancer mesothelioma disease in San Diego, San Francisco.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

Read About Asbestos Related Disease

Read About Asbestos Related Disease

Asbestos is a toxic chemical substance that has been used directly or indirectly in hundreds of products across the globe. It is incorrect and inappropriate for human beings to have excessive exposure to asbestos. This might result in malignant mesothelioma — a rare cancer that affects the lining of the lungs, abdomen or heart — and other diseases. It is amazing to find that, asbestos has still not been entirely banned in the United States, and Americans continue to risk exposure to this dangerous fiber.

If you feel that you have been exhibiting symptoms of mesothelioma (like shortness of breath, pain in the chest or back region, swelling in the abdomen, difficulty swallowing, cough, fever, sweating, fatigue, and weight loss.), it is important for you to consult your doctor immediately. There are various methods that are available for treating the victims of mesothelioma.

They are either direct methods or alternative methods. Some of the direct methods are Surgery-both Aggressive and Pallative, Chemotherapy, Radiation therapy etc. Immunoagumentive Therapy (IAT), Gene Therapy, Intraoperative Photodynamic Therapy (IPT) etc. are some of the commonly practiced alternative methods.

Also one can take the help of Support Groups, which are available to help sufferers deal with the challenges that they are facing. A recent publication says that over 20% of Americans have participated in some type of self-help group. There are mainly two types of support groups that are available namely- online support groups and community centred support groups.

If you have already been diagnosed with mesothelioma it is important for you to have a positive frame of mind and keep yourself well informed about the latest medical developments that has taken place pertaining to this field. Also as a victim of the Asbestos industry you can have certain legal and social claims. The following propositions can be considered if you are a victim of Mesothelioma caused due to negligent asbestos exposure.

1. Legal Aid and Financial Compensation

People who contract the disease must be absolutely sure that the cause for the same was asbestos exposure and then take steps to get the right legal counsel. Once the legal counsel has been retained the law will ensure that he or she gets the compensation for employers negligence if any.

2. Claim from the Asbestos Industry

Mesothelioma victims have the option to claim large monetary compensation from the asbestos industry. These claims can go into the millions of dollars depending on the rights and cause of the claims. A Law firm that specializes in mesothelioma cases ensures that the families of victims gets ample compensation.

3. Claim Social Security Disability

Victims can claim social security disability after getting advice from an attorney that specializes in these cases.

4. Disability Insurance

You are legally entailed to claim disability insurance if you have disability insurance either privately procured, within your life insurance policy or through your employer.

5.Worker’s Compensation

It is one of the core responsibilities of an employer to take care of its employees. Thus, even while the victim takes legal action against the asbestos industry he or she can simultaneously claim workers compensation for being ‘disabled’ during work. A lawyer who has experience in the asbestos industry should handle this sort of claim.

6. Health Insurance

A victim of mesothelioma can incur huge medical bills due to the expensive nature of treatment that’s required for the treatment of this disease. If a victim is admitted to the hospital he or she should talk to the Discharge Planner or other personnel who can help with hospice and hospital coverage. Laws cover medial treatments and action can be taken health insurance company if they fail to provide proper coverage. Again it is imperative to ensure that the victim employs a proper legal representative.

Information on types of ocd can be found at the Health And Nutrition Tips site.


Article from articlesbase.com

Related Mesothelioma Causes Articles

Comprehensive Screening and Clinical Assessment for Asbestos-Related Disease

Comprehensive Screening and Clinical Assessment for Asbestos-Related Disease

Examining Mesothelioma disease by juxtaposing various research studies leads to interesting conclusions.  One interesting study is called, “A histochemical study of the asbestos body coating” by M. Governa, C. Rosanda – Br J Ind Med 1972;29:  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – A histochemical study of the asbestos body coating. Asbestos bodies after iron extraction were tested by histochemical methods for mucopolysaccharides. The results of the reactions suggest that acid mucopolysaccharides are present in the coating of most bodies. During the formation of the bodies acid mucopolysaccharides might act as a matrix for iron deposition on the coating.”

Another interesting study is called, “Medical examination for asbestos-related disease” by Stephen M. Levin MD, P. Elizabeth Kann MD, MPH, Michael B. Lax MD, MPH
Am. J. Ind. Med. 37:6–22, 2000.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – There are millions of workers whose exposure to asbestos dust prior to the implementation of asbestos regulation and improved control measures places them at risk of asbestos-related disease today. In addition, workers are still being exposed to significant amounts of asbestos, when asbestos materials in place are disturbed during renovation, repair, or demolition. Given the continued presence of asbestos-containing materials in industrial, commercial, and residential settings throughout the U.S., a sizeable population remains at risk of asbestos-related disease.

This article reviews the health effects associated with exposure to asbestos and delineates the steps necessary for the comprehensive screening and clinical assessment for asbestos-related disease, in order to assist physicians in identifying and preventing illness associated with exposure to asbestos among their patients.”

Another study is called, “Manganese superoxide dismutase genotypes and asbestos-associated pulmonary disorders” by Ari Hirvonena, Jarno Tuimalaa, Tiina Ollikainena, Kaija Linnainmaaa, Vuokko Kinnulab – Volume 178, Issue 1, Pages 71-74 (8 April 2002).  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity is highly elevated in the biopsies of human asbestos-associated malignant mesothelioma. We therefore examined if polymorphism in the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the MnSOD gene modified individual susceptibility to this malignancy or related asbestos-associated pulmonary disorders. The study population consisted of 124 male Finnish asbestos insulators who were all classified as having been exposed to high levels of asbestos; 63 of the workers had no pulmonary disorders and 61 either had malignant mesothelioma or the non-malignant pulmonary disorders asbestosis and/or pleural plaques. No significant associations were found between the MnSOD genotypes and these ill-health. This study therefore suggest no major modifying role for the MnSOD polymorphism in development of asbestos-associated pulmonary disorders.”

Another interesting study is called, “Cigarette Smoking, Asbestos Exposure, and Malignant Mesothelioma” by Joshua E. Muscat, and Ernst L. Wynder – Cancer Res May 1, 1991 51; 2263.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – In a hospital-based case-control study of 124 (105 male and 19 female) histologically confirmed malignant mesothelioma cases and age- and sex-matched controls, the role of cigarette smoking and the risk of asbestos exposure was investigated. Exposure to asbestos for at least 1 year was likely for 78% of male cases and 16% of female cases, and 90% of males were possibly exposed. Male cases worked predominately in the ship-building industry, construction, or insulation trades. Elevated risks were found for males employed in asbestos-related industries [odds ratio (OR) 8.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.9–13.5], e.g., shipyards (OR 82.9, 95% CI 25.5–269.1), construction/maintenance (OR 8.3, 95% CI 4.6–14.8), and other asbestos-related jobs (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.4–7.2), and for males who self-reported exposure to asbestos or insulation (OR 50.9, 95% CI 21.7–119.8). A statistically significant trend was found for the risk of mesothelioma with increasing years employed in non-shipyard asbestos-related occupations. Among women, only one case worked in an asbestos-related industry and two reported domestic contact with asbestos. No association between cigarette smoking and mesothelioma was found for either men or women. We also report the occurrence of mesothelioma in occupations which have not been previously reported.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers for their important work.  If you found any of these excerpts helpful, please read the studies in their entirety.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please click on the following links

Depuy Hip Recall Attorneys

Depuy Hip Recall Lawyers

Mesothelioma Lawyer


Article from articlesbase.com

Related Mesothelioma Disease Articles

Categories