Posts Tagged ‘Mesotheliomas’

Pleural Mesothelioma?s Unique Indicator of the Onset of Mesothelioma

Pleural Mesothelioma?s Unique Indicator of the Onset of Mesothelioma

Pleural mesothelioma diagnosis is typically met with the striking news that a patient has less than a year or two to live. Early diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma can increase the likelihood of effective treatment. Identifying a level of protein from a specific gene might just be the key to early mesothelioma treatment.

Pleural mesothelioma is significantly more alarming than other asbestos-caused diseases such as asbestosis because of the high risk of death that comes along with the diagnosis of this cancer. However, the short life span that follows mesothelioma is often a result of its late diagnosis. If this asbestos caused cancer were to be diagnosed earlier, then potentially life-saving treatment could begin earlier.

Pleural mesothelioma and asbestosis are lung diseases that produce symptoms similar to hundreds of other potential respiratory illnesses and cancers. Although a history of working with asbestos is a strong indicator that asbestos may be the cause of a patient’s lung disease, many patients fail to mention their working history to their physicians, and many physicians dismiss the possibility of asbestos related disease because of its low reported statistics. These statistics, however, are vastly under-reported, as many countries do not have the access to the medical knowledge, equipment, or personnel to correctly determine and report asbestos-caused diseases. Asbestos use continues to thrive around the world, and the incidences of asbestos caused cancer and asbestosis will continue to thrive as well.

Medial researchers are trying to prepare for the future epidemic of asbestos illnesses that the asbestos workers of today will be suffering from in the upcoming decades. Although a cure for pleural mesothelioma is far off in the distance, medical researchers have found that a protein gene identified as osteoprontin exists in patients with this disease and their serum osteoprontin levels are six times higher than other lung disease patients. Osteoprontin is typically associated with the bones since it is a protein located in the bones. However, the gene is an active participant and an important player in bone remodeling, wound healing, and the immune system. The University of Bristol in the UK also found that the gene needs to be suppressed to prevent dangerous scarring of internal tissues and have begun to work on a gel to speed up wound healing that facilitates this suppression.

For patients suffering from undiagnosed respiratory illnesses, identifying an increase in serum osteoprontin can distinguish asbestos cancer from asbestosis or lung cancer. This will save years of unnecessary testing and expenses, provide the opportunity for early cancer treatment, and even increase the swiftness of processing asbestos workers’ compensation claims.

Pleural mesothelioma research, medical research on asbestosis, and medical research on other asbestos-related diseases continues to contribute valuable findings that can contribute to improving care and provide valuable medical insights that can be applied within multiple medical fields. Soluble mesothelin-related peptide is similar to osteoprontin, and is also a unique identifier of mesothelioma. Accessible medical access that can test individuals for both of these unique markers can have a significant impact on the health and longevity of today’s asbestos workers. Lung diseases may soon be more easily differentiated. But that isn’t enough. Medical accessibility must be improved around the world so today’s asbestos workers can get the early treatment they need to survive.

Asbestosis-Mesothelioma website provides Asbestosis, Mesothelioma and
asbestos treatments news, law and many other useful information.


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Mesothelioma’s Deadly Causes and Solutions

Mesothelioma’s Deadly Causes and Solutions

Mesothelioma is a form of cancer caused due to exposure to asbestos. Mesothelioma mainly affects the mesothelium which is a protective lining covering all internal organs of the body. Mostly, it originates in the pleura, which is the between the outer part of the lungs & the chest cavity. Mesothelioma may also attack in or the lining of abdominal cavity (peritoneum) or the sac which surrounds heart (that is, pericardium).

It has been observed that person having <a rel=”nofollow” onclick=”javascript:_gaq.push(['_trackPageview', '/outgoing/article_exit_link']);” href=”http://mesotheliomastraight.net”>Mesothelioma</a> must have worked on a job where he may have inhaled asbestos particulates, or he might have been exposed to asbestos dust and fiber in any other way. It might be caused just by washing cloths of some family member handling asbestos regularly. But, unlike lung and oral cancer, there exists no link between mesothelioma & smoking. It is an unbelievable fact that an exposure of 1 or 2 months could result in mesothelioma 30 or 40 yrs later and for some, as much as seventy years later. People exposed in the 1960s and ’70s are now diagnosed of mesothelioma due to the long latency of asbestos deposit.

On suffering from <a rel=”nofollow” onclick=”javascript:_gaq.push(['_trackPageview', '/outgoing/article_exit_link']);” href=”http://mesotheliomastraight.net”>Mesothelioma</a>, patient may have breathlessness, slight pain in the chest and cough, while peritoneal mesothelioma causes patient to lose weight and pain in the abdomen. Peritoneal mesothelioma causes obstruction in bowel-area, abnormal blood clotting, anemia, and may also cause fever. In case the cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it may cause pain, troublesome swallowing, or swelling in neck and face. Mesothelioma can only be diagnosed from biopsy by pathological examination If further examination is warranted, more tests may be done. Mesothelioma has three kinds of treatments. First one involves surgery, that is, to take out the cancer. Secondly, the deadly radiation therapy to kill cancer causing cells. The third is the chemotherapy, in which drugs are inserted in body to fight cancer.

I am a health care professional who writes about mesothelioma at Mesothelioma Striaght. My latest post is here: Mesothelioma Details and Findings.


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Pulmonary Toxicity and Malignant Mesotheliomas

Pulmonary Toxicity and Malignant Mesotheliomas

Another interesting study is called, “Potential Role of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Mesothelioma: Clinical Experience with Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid
Clinical Lung Cancer” – Chest Surg Clin N Am. 1994 Feb;4(1):113-26 – Allen KB, Faber LP, Warren WH.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma is an uncommon, uniformly fatal malignancy. Controversy continues to surround the optimal surgical procedure, both extrapleural pneumonectomy or pleurectomy, which should be utilized in conjunction with post-operative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. This retrospective study reviews a single institution’s experience with extrapleural pneumonectomy and pleurectomy in the multimodality treatment of diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma.

Another interesting study is called, “Phase II trial of mitomycin in malignant mesothelioma.” By Bajorin, D, Kelsen, D, Mintzer, DM – CANCER TREAT. REP. Vol. 71, no. 9, pp. 857-858. 1987.  Here is an excerpt: “Malignant mesothelioma is a highly lethal neoplasm. Recent data noted in vivo antineoplastic effects of a combination of mitomycin and cisplatin (DDP) greater than either agent alone in human tumor xenograft mesothelioma. While DDP singly has some efficacy, mitomycin has not been systematically evaluated in this disease. A phase II trial was therefore conducted to determine the activity of mitomycin in malignant mesothelioma. Pulmonary toxicity was substantial. Two responding patients developed dyspnea and hypoxemia occurring at cumulative doses of 40 and 50 mg/m super(2), respectively. One patient had a transbronchial biopsy consistent with drug-induced pulmonary fibrosis and never achieved resolution of hypoxemia with corticosteroid therapy prior to death from progressive mesothelioma. The second patient responded to corticosteroid therapy with resolution of dyspnea and hypoxemia but relapsed after discontinuing mitomycin.”

Another interesting study is called, “Immunohistological staining of reactive mesothelium, mesothelioma, and lung carcinoma with a panel of monoclonal antibodies.” – J Clin Pathol 1987;40:19-25 by A K Ghosh, K C Gatter, M S Dunnill, D Y Mason.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – A panel of seven monoclonal antiepithelial antibodies of different specificities, including anticytokeratin, human milk fat globule membrane, C, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used with the alkaline phosphatase-antialkaline phosphatase (APAAP) immunostaining technique to determine their value in the differentiation between benign and malignant mesothelial cells and lung carcinoma in histological preparations. The anticytokeratin antibody reacted strongly with all cases of reactive mesothelium, mesothelioma, and lung carcinoma. Antibodies to human milk fat globule membrane and the Ca antigen stained mesothelioma and carcinoma and 43% of cases of reactive mesothelium. Staining for carcinoembryonic antigen was not detected in reactive mesothelium or mesothelioma, but was present in most of the lung carcinomas. CEA seemed to be the single most useful marker in distinguishing carcinoma from mesothelioma in that a positive reaction for CEA would indicate carcinoma rather than mesothelioma.”

Another interesting study is called, “Podoplanin as a marker for Mesothelioma” by Noriko Kimura, Itaru Kimura – Pathology International – Volume 55, Issue 2, pages 83–86, February 2005.  Here is an excerpt: “Podoplanin is a specific marker for lymph vessel endothelial cells. It was noted that podoplanin is expressed in reactive mesothelial cells. The utility of podoplanin for the histological diagnosis of tumors was then investigated, especially for mesothelioma. Immunohistochemical study of podoplanin was carried out in five malignant mesotheliomas and 118 other tumors including 93 adenocarcinomas, four squamous cell carcinomas, six gastrointestinal stromal tumors and five endocrine tumors. Immunoreactivity for podoplanin was demonstrated on the cell membrane of tumor cells for all mesotheliomas. All other tumors were negative for podoplanin. Among the many antibodies used for differential diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma, podoplanin has the potential to be an excellent tumor marker in both specificity and sensitivity. The utility of podoplanin as a marker for mesothelioma will be confirmed by further studies.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

Depuy Hip Recall Attorney

Depuy Hip Recall Lawyer

Malignant Mesothelioma

 

 


Article from articlesbase.com

Epithelial Mesotheliomas Thrombomodulin and Asbestos Disease

Epithelial Mesotheliomas Thrombomodulin and Asbestos Disease

Another interesting study is called, “Mesothelioma-binding antibodies: thrombomodulin, OV 632 and HBME-1 and their use in the diagnosis of malignant Mesothelioma” by R.L. Attanoos, H. Goddard, A.R. Gibbs – Histopathology – Volume 29, Issue 3, pages 209–215, September 1996.  Here is an excerpt: “The aim of this study was to examine the expression of three putative mesothelioma-binding antibodies, thrombomodulin, OV 632 and HBME-1 in 42 malignant mesotheliomas (27 pleural and 15 peritoneal) and 32 pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Evaluation of their use in differentiating between the mesotheliomas and pulmonary adenocarcinomas was assessed. Thrombomodulin was expressed by 22 of 42 (52%) mesotheliomas but was seen in eight of 12 pure epithelial-type mesotheliomas of the pleura and in all four papillary epithelial peritoneal mesotheliomas. For pure epithelial mesotheliomas thrombomodulin was 75% sensitive. Only two of 32 pulmonary adenocarcinomas were immunoreactive yielding a 94% specificity for thrombomodulin. In comparison, OV 632 and HBME-1 showed 67% and 62% antibody sensitivity, respectively, for malignant mesothelioma but this was accompanied by low specificity (OV 632, 37%; HBME-1, 28%). Both OV 632 and HBME-1 are considered unsuitable for use in differentiating between mesotheliomas and pulmonary adenocarcinomas. We advocate the use of thrombomodulin as a mesothelioma-binding antibody in the standard panel of antibodies used in the evaluation of malignant mesothelioma.”

Another interesting study is called, “Phase II Study of Pemetrexed Plus Carboplatin in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma” by Giovanni L. Ceresoli, Paolo A. Zucali, Adolfo G. Favaretto, Francesco Grossi, Paolo Bidoli, Guido Del Conte, Anna Ceribelli, Alessandra Bearz, Emanuela Morenghi, Raffaele Cavina, Maurizio Marangolo, Hector J. Soto Parra, Armando Santoro – Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol 24, No 9 (March 20), 2006: pp. 1443-1448 – Here is an excerpt: “ABSTRACT – PURPOSE: This multicenter, phase II clinical study was conducted to evaluate the activity of the combination of pemetrexed and carboplatin in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive patients with measurable disease and adequate organ function, who were not eligible for curative surgery, received pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 and carboplatin area under the plasma concentration-time curve of 5 mg/mL/min, administered intravenously every 21 days. All patients received folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation. Pemetrexed was provided within the Expanded Access Program.

RESULTS: A total of 102 patients were enrolled. An objective response was achieved in 19 patients (two complete and 17 partial responses), for a response rate of 18.6% (95% CI, 11.6% to 27.5%). Forty-eight patients (47.0%; 95% CI, 37.1% to 57.2%) had stable disease after treatment. Overall, 67 patients (65.7%) achieved disease control (95% CI, 55.6% to 74.8%). Median time to progression was 6.5 months; median overall survival time was 12.7 months. Compliance to treatment was excellent, with a relative dose-intensity of 97% for pemetrexed and 98% for carboplatin. Toxicity was mild, with grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurring in 9.7% of total cycles and grade 3 or 4 anemia occurring in 3.5% of total cycles. Nonhematologic toxicity was negligible.

CONCLUSION: Treatment with pemetrexed and carboplatin was active and well tolerated in patients with MPM. Disease control rate, time to disease progression, and overall survival were similar to the results achieved with the standard regimen of pemetrexed and cisplatin, suggesting that the carboplatin combination could be an alternative option for these patients.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers.  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links

Depuy Hip Recall Attorney

Depuy Hip Recall Attorney

Malignant Mesothelioma


Article from articlesbase.com

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Peritoneal Mesothelioma and Malignant Mesotheliomas

Peritoneal Mesothelioma and Malignant Mesotheliomas

Peritoneal mesothelioma is less common than pleural mesothelioma, but both of these typically malignant mesotheliomas can be just as tragic. Peritoneal mesothelioma begins in the abdominal cavity, as opposed to the lungs and pleural areas of pleural mesothelioma. “Peritoneal” means it has to do with the peritoneum, which is a membrane that surrounds the abdominal area. “Pleural” refers to the pleura which is a membrane that surrounds the lungs. There is also a “pericardial” mesothelioma which targets the heart membrane first.

The lungs, abdominal area and heart all have a membrane made up of mesothelial cells, named the mesothelium. A cancerous attack of these membrane areas are mesotheliomas. Asbestos is the cause of peritoneal mesothelioma, pleural mesothelioma and pericardial mesothelioma in well over 90% of the cases. There are a few rare recorded cases of malignant mesothelioma when asbestos exposure was not identified. If you have been exposed to asbestos, there is a high chance you will suffer from an asbestos-caused disease such as asbestosis or pleural plaques. However, not all asbestos-caused diseases are fatal.

Peritoneal mesothelioma, pleural mesothelioma and pericardial mesothelioma can be fatal malignant mesotheliomas which spread uncontrollably, or they can be benign, when the tumor stays where it is and can likely be removed. Unexplainable weight loss is a mesothelioma symptom which may occur in as many as 90% of benign and malignant mesothelioma. Generally, benign mesothelioma tends to show less symptoms than malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelioma symptoms for peritoneal mesothelioma almost always includes abdominal pain. This is because there is excess fluid between the peritoneal membrane and the abdomen walls. Pleural mesothelioma has excess fluid in the pleural area and this causes shortness of breath and chest pain.

The mesothelioma symptoms of pleural mesothelioma and pericardial mesothelioma are not as outwardly visible as the symptoms of peritoneal mesothelioma. In peritoneal mesothelioma, the abdomen can appear larger. Tumor masses may be visible, but external tumor visibility only occurs in a minority of peritoneal mesothelioma cases. Nausea is a common mesothelioma symptom with peritoneal mesothelioma, and the abdominal area will also be very tender.

In a healthy peritoneal area between the membrane and the wall, the peritoneal fluid helps the intestines move food. In peritoneal mesothelioma however, excess fluid causes bowel obstruction. The mesothelioma symptoms of extra fluid and bowel obstruction both contribute to abdominal pain. The bowel obstruction can also produce mesothelioma symptoms of constipation and diarrhea. Many peritoneal malignant mesothelioma patients have reported mesothelioma symptoms of a burning sensation in the abdomen. Mesothelioma symptoms for peritoneal malignant mesothelioma may not surface for 20-30 years after asbestos exposure, but it generally surfaces sooner than pleural mesothelioma.

Peritoneal mesothelioma is fortunately rare, however its rarity sometimes makes it harder to diagnose. The symptoms are similar to hernias and gall bladder problems, and identifying peritoneal mesothelioma in a CT scan is difficult. The medical industry is aware that asbestos-related diseases will be escalating over the upcoming years, and treatment for peritoneal malignant mesothelioma is undergoing many clinical trials. If you have been exposed to asbestos and have unexplainable abdominal pain and are experiencing unexplained weight loss, begin preliminary testing for peritoneal mesothelioma. The sooner the testing begins, the higher the chances for symptomatic relief, and hopefully today’s mesothelioma clinical trials will lead to a mesothelioma cure in the future.

The website provides mesothelioma information, such as mesothelioma symptoms, mesothelioma treatments and mesothelioma stages. The site also


provided details information about different type of mesothelioma: Malignant Mesothelioma, Pleural Mesothelioma,


Pericardial mesothelioma and Peritoneal mesothelioma.


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Benign Mesothelioma is a disease whose only known cause is exposure to Asbestos. When Asbestos fibers are inhaled, they can lodge in the cells of the Mesothelium, a membrane that lines the abdominal cavity, heart and lungs. Find out more about benign Mesothelioma and other cancers that affect these areas, at our website kazanvideo.com. If you have been exposed to Asbestos in the San Francisco area, we can help. Call 877.622.5246 today.
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