Posts Tagged ‘Pleural’

Scottish Pleural Plaques Compensation Bill to Overturn House of Lords Ruling

Scottish Pleural Plaques Compensation Bill to Overturn House of Lords Ruling

 

The Scottish government has amended its proposed bill on pleural plaques, a condition caused by exposure to asbestos, to ensure that all symptomless victims can claim for damages, including those with asymptomatic asbestosis or pleural thickening.

The bill seeks to overturn the House Of Lords’ decision in October 2007 that pleural plaques is not a disease, which left thousands of sufferers ineligible for compensation. Previously pleural plaques sufferers were able to seek awards of up to £15,000. This ruling is thought to have saved the insurance industry around £1.4 billion and has led to sustained pressure from some MPs, campaign groups and unions, who believe that the workers should be compensated for a medical condition that was sustained through no fault of their own.

Pleural plaques are areas of fibrosis or scars on the lung tissue on the inner surface of the ribcage and diaphragm caused by long term to exposure to asbestos. While the disease itself is usually benign, around one in seven people affected by pleural plaques will go on to develop mesothelioma, the aggressive form of lung cancer almost always caused by occupational exposure to asbestos.

Mesothelioma causes thickening of the lining of lungs and will eventually lead to tumours developing; unfortunately it is untreatable and is always fatal. The prognosis for those who develop the disease is very poor, with roughly a two-year life expectancy after diagnosis.

Symptoms may not appear for 20 to 50 years after exposure to asbestos. Consequently there have been a rising number of mesothelioma claims over the last few years, as those exposed to asbestos when there was no health and safety guidance on handling asbestos are now developing the disease. It is thought that the number of mesthelioma cases will peak in 2020 with over 10,000 dying from the disease.

The insurance industry has been shocked by the bill and reacted angrily. If the bill becomes law, pleural plaques claims could run into millions of pounds in Scotland alone and could put additional pressure on the English Government to look again at the House of Lords decision. However, it is the insurance industry’s contention that pleural plaques is a symptomless disease and does not necessarily lead to asbestos related diseases.

Nick Starling, Director of General Insurance and Health at the ABI, said: “There is medical agreement, as today’s Bill confirms, that pleural plaques are symptomless, do not impact on a person’s health and do not develop into asbestos related diseases. To compensate for pleural plaques would fly in the face of accepted medical opinion, the Law Lords ruling and common sense.”

Asbestos campaigners welcomed the decision, with Community Safety Minister, Fergus Ewing commenting, “We should not turn our back on these people. That is why the Scottish Government has taken urgent steps to overrule the House of Lords judgement and ensure that people with pleural plaques can continue to raise an action for damages.”

If you or someone you know has mesothelioma, it is important that they seek the immediate assistance of an experienced claims solicitor so that you can bring the claim to court as soon as possible and that money is made available during the lifetime of the injured party.

http://www.1stclaims.co.uk is run by a non-practising Personal Injury Solicitor with over 14 years personal injury claims experience.

For further information, please visit http://www.gettingpersonal.co.uk


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Evaluating Benign and Malignant Lung and Pleural Masses in Asbestosis and Mesothelioma

Evaluating Benign and Malignant Lung and Pleural Masses in Asbestosis and Mesothelioma

Exposure to asbestos in the workplace is the most common cause of Mesothelioma disease.  Continued research is necessary if we are ever to find a cure.  One interesting study is called, “Exposure to Asbestos and Human Disease.” By Becklake, MR – New England Journal of Medicine Vol. 306, no. 24, pp. 1480-1482. 1982.  Here is an excerpt: “During the past two decades, ill health resulting from exposure to asbestos has been the subject of extensive observation and research — probably more intensive than research on any other environmental agent. In the most direct target organ, the lung, in its pleural coverings, there is a wide spectrum of response after exposure; not only acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but also cancer of these organs may occur. Research has been stimulated by the belief that the more complete our understanding of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the better will be the ability to control the continued use of this mineral in today’s complex technologic world.”

Another interesting study is called, “Analysis of amphibole asbestos in chrysotile and other minerals.” By Addison, J, Davies, LST – Annals of Occupational Hygiene [ANN. OCCUP. HYG.]. Vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 159-175. 1990.  Here is an excerpt: “Chrysotile asbestos and many other mineral raw materials contain amphibole minerals which may be asbestiform. There is currently no analytical method which will detect the presence of amphibole at sufficiently low limits to preclude the possibility of inadvertent exposure of persons handling these materials to hazardous airborne fibre concentrations. A method of chemical digestion of chrysotiles has been tested with regard to the determination of their tremolite contaminant content and this has been applied to a range of chrysotile and other minerals. The method improves the sensitivity of the amphibole analysis at least 10-fold giving detection limits of 0.01-0.05% in chrysotile by X-ray diffractometry.”

Another interesting study is called, “Computed tomography in the diagnosis of asbestos-related thoracic disease” by Gamsu, Gordon MD; Aberle, Denise R. MD; Lynch, David MD, BCh – Journal of Thoracic Imaging – January 1989 – Volume 4 – Issue 1.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) has improved the radiologist’s ability to detect and potentially quantify the abnormalities of asbestos exposure. It has proved to be more sensitive than chest radiography for detecting pleural plaques and for discriminating between pleural fibrosis and extrapleural fat. HRCT is also more sensitive than chest radiography or conventional CT for detecting parenchymal abnormalities in asbestos-exposed persons. The HRCT findings that correlate with other parameters of asbestosis include (1) septal and centrilobular thickening, (2) parenchymal fibrous bands, (3) honeycomb patterns, (4) subpleural density persisting in the prone position, and (5) subpleural curvilinear lines that persist in the prone position. CT has an important role in evaluating benign and malignant lung and pleural masses in asbestosis.”

Another study is called, “Effect of Long-Term Removal of Iron from Asbestos by Desferrioxamine B on Subsequent Mobilization by Other Chelators and Induction of DNA Single-Strand Breaks” by Chao C. C. and Aust A. E. – Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics – Volume 308, Issue 1, January 1994, Pages 64-69.  Here is an excerpt: “
Abstract – The long-term removal of iron from crocidolite or amosite by desferrioxamine B (DF) at pH 7.5 or 5.0 was studied. Crocidolite or amosite (1 mg/ml) was suspended in 50 mM NaCl at pH 7.5 or 5.0 with the addition of 1 mM DF for up to 90 days. Although the rate of iron mobilization decreased with time, iron was continuously mobilized from both forms of asbestos at pH 5.0 or 7.5. The amount of iron mobilized from crocidolite was at least twice that mobilized from amosite at either pH. Iron was mobilized more rapidly from crocidolite at pH 5.0 than at 7.5 for the first 15 days, but at later times the amount being mobilized at pH 7.5 became equal to or slightly greater than that at 5.0. For amosite, the mobilization at pH 5.0 was always greater than that at pH 7.5. Next, the effect of iron removal from asbestos by DF on subsequent iron mobilization by a second chelator (EDTA or citrate) and on induction of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) was studied. Asbestos, treated for up to 15 days with DF at pH 7.5, was washed to remove ferrioxamine and excess DF, then incubated with EDTA or citrate (1 mM). The rates of iron mobilization from both forms of asbestos by a second chelator decreased as more and more iron was removed by DF. Induction of DNA SSBs also decreased, reflecting the unavailability of iron to catalyze the damage. The results suggest three things. First, if long-term mobilization of iron from asbestos occurs in vivo as has been observed in vitro, it may play a role in the long-term biological effects of asbestos. Second, more rapid mobilization of iron from asbestos fibers may occur when the fibers are phagocytized by cells and maintained in phagosomes where the pH is 4.0-5.0. Third, treatment of asbestos by iron chelators, such as DF, prior to exposure to cultured cells or whole animals, may reduce the biological effects of asbestos resulting from iron, but may not completely eliminate them.”

We all owe a debt of gratitude to these fine researchers for their hard work and dedication.  If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.

 

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please visit the following links

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Mesothelioma Pleural Fibroma

Mesothelioma Pleural Fibroma

Mesothelioma Pleural Fibroma. This tumor falls in the category of benign type. There are usually two types: benign (solitary) and malign/ant (diffuse). The biological behaviour of the mesothelioma cancer can be usually predicted by their gross appearance – those that form solitary, discrete masses are generally benign, whereas the other type, who grows diffusely, are usually malignant. Benign or solitary mesothelioma tumor is also called pleural fibroma. The exposure to asbestos plays no role on the aetiology of benign mesothelioma. Generally speaking it consists of a solitary type, circumscribed, small, firm mass, generally less than 3cm in diameter. Cut surface shows spirals of dense fibrous tissue. Microscopically, the tumour is predominantly composed of curls of collagen fibres and reticulin with interspersed fibroblasts. Rarely, mesothelial-lined clefts are seen in the tumor. Benign mesothelioma causes no symptoms and is detected as an incidental radiologic finding. Sometimes the tumour is associated with systemic syndrome of osteoarthropathy or hypoglycemia. Removal of the tumour is generally curative.

Mesothelioma Pleural Fibroma

Malignant or diffuse mesothelioma is rare. It is a highly malignant tumor associated with high deadly rate. The tumor is significant in view of its acknowledge association with occupational job’s exposure to asbestos fibers for a large number of years, sometimes more than 20 years. About 90% of malignant mesothelioma tumors are asbestos related which means that the patients were in direct or indirect contact with this mineral. Mechanism of carcinogenecity by asbestos is not quite clear but it appears that prolonged exposure of the mineral type of asbestos with people swallowing and breathing it is capable of inducing oncogenic mutation in the mesothelium.

Mesothelioma Pleural Fibroma 

John has been writing articles for nearly 3 years. Come visit his latest website over for more articles at: www.mesotheliomapleuralfibroma.info/ which helps readers finding more about Pleural Benign Tumors, info and details.


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Pleural Mesothelioma?s Unique Indicator of the Onset of Mesothelioma

Pleural Mesothelioma?s Unique Indicator of the Onset of Mesothelioma

Pleural mesothelioma diagnosis is typically met with the striking news that a patient has less than a year or two to live. Early diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma can increase the likelihood of effective treatment. Identifying a level of protein from a specific gene might just be the key to early mesothelioma treatment.

Pleural mesothelioma is significantly more alarming than other asbestos-caused diseases such as asbestosis because of the high risk of death that comes along with the diagnosis of this cancer. However, the short life span that follows mesothelioma is often a result of its late diagnosis. If this asbestos caused cancer were to be diagnosed earlier, then potentially life-saving treatment could begin earlier.

Pleural mesothelioma and asbestosis are lung diseases that produce symptoms similar to hundreds of other potential respiratory illnesses and cancers. Although a history of working with asbestos is a strong indicator that asbestos may be the cause of a patient’s lung disease, many patients fail to mention their working history to their physicians, and many physicians dismiss the possibility of asbestos related disease because of its low reported statistics. These statistics, however, are vastly under-reported, as many countries do not have the access to the medical knowledge, equipment, or personnel to correctly determine and report asbestos-caused diseases. Asbestos use continues to thrive around the world, and the incidences of asbestos caused cancer and asbestosis will continue to thrive as well.

Medial researchers are trying to prepare for the future epidemic of asbestos illnesses that the asbestos workers of today will be suffering from in the upcoming decades. Although a cure for pleural mesothelioma is far off in the distance, medical researchers have found that a protein gene identified as osteoprontin exists in patients with this disease and their serum osteoprontin levels are six times higher than other lung disease patients. Osteoprontin is typically associated with the bones since it is a protein located in the bones. However, the gene is an active participant and an important player in bone remodeling, wound healing, and the immune system. The University of Bristol in the UK also found that the gene needs to be suppressed to prevent dangerous scarring of internal tissues and have begun to work on a gel to speed up wound healing that facilitates this suppression.

For patients suffering from undiagnosed respiratory illnesses, identifying an increase in serum osteoprontin can distinguish asbestos cancer from asbestosis or lung cancer. This will save years of unnecessary testing and expenses, provide the opportunity for early cancer treatment, and even increase the swiftness of processing asbestos workers’ compensation claims.

Pleural mesothelioma research, medical research on asbestosis, and medical research on other asbestos-related diseases continues to contribute valuable findings that can contribute to improving care and provide valuable medical insights that can be applied within multiple medical fields. Soluble mesothelin-related peptide is similar to osteoprontin, and is also a unique identifier of mesothelioma. Accessible medical access that can test individuals for both of these unique markers can have a significant impact on the health and longevity of today’s asbestos workers. Lung diseases may soon be more easily differentiated. But that isn’t enough. Medical accessibility must be improved around the world so today’s asbestos workers can get the early treatment they need to survive.

Asbestosis-Mesothelioma website provides Asbestosis, Mesothelioma and
asbestos treatments news, law and many other useful information.


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Pleural Thickening and Profusion Resulting From Asbestos Exposure

Pleural Thickening and Profusion Resulting From Asbestos Exposure

Asbestos exposure is a known cause of cancer.  A plethora of research has been done in the past to establish causation.  One interesting study is called, “Asbestos exposure and asbestos-related pleural and parenchymal disease associations with immune imbalance” by Sprince NL, Oliver LC, McLoud TC, Eisen EA, Christiani DC, Ginns LC – Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991 Apr;143(4 Pt 1):822-8. Medical Services Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – The study hypothesis was that asbestos exposure and asbestos-related pleural plaques and interstitial disease are associated with (1) immune imbalances favoring helper-inducer T-cell subsets in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and (2) T-lymphocyte accumulation in BAL. One hundred twenty-two asbestos-exposed subsets (AES), including 27 nonsmokers (NS), were evaluated and compared with 10 unexposed normal subjects. Data were collected on medical, smoking, and occupational histories, physical examination, spirometry, lung volumes, single-breath DLCO, chest films read by a “B” reader, and T-lymphocyte characterization in blood and BAL using flow cytometry analysis of monoclonal-antibody-treated cells. On average, AES were 47 yr of age and had 23 yr of asbestos exposure. Fifty-eight (48%) had pleural thickening, and seven (6%) had profusion greater than or equal to 1/0. In blood, asbestos-exposed NS had lower total and percent CD8 and lower total CD3 than did normal subjects. In BAL, asbestos-exposed NS had higher total CD3 than did normal subjects. Among AES, increased asbestos exposure was associated with increased percent CD8 in BAL and decreases in both percent lymphocytes and total CD8 in blood. Increase in CD4/CD8 ratio in BAL were associated with pleural thickening. In those seven with profusion greater than or equal to 1/0, there was increased percent CD4 in blood and decreased percent CD8 in BAL. These results suggest immune imbalance favoring helper-inducer T-cell subsets in association with asbestos exposure systemically and with pleural plaques in BAL.”

A second study is called, “Changing attitudes and opinions regarding asbestos and cancer 1934-1965″ by Enterline PE.  Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261.  Am J Ind Med. 1991;20(5):685-700.  Here is an excerpt: “Literature published in the years 1934-1965 was reviewed to determine attitudes and opinions of scientists as to whether asbestos is a cause of cancer. In Germany, the issue was decided in 1943 when the government decreed that lung cancer, when associated with asbestosis (of any degree), was an occupational disease. In the United States, however, there was no consensus on the issue until 1964. Opinions of scientists over a 22 year period are shown and the contributions of various cultural, social, economic and political factors to these opinions are discussed. A lack of experimental and epidemiological evidence played a major role in delaying a consensus. Other important factors included a rejection of science conducted outside of the U.S. during this period, particularly a rejection of German scientific thought during and after WWII, and a rejection of clinical evidence in favor of epidemiological investigations. Individual writers rarely changed their minds on the subject of asbestos as a cause of cancer.”

If you found any of these studies interesting, please read them in their entirety.  We all owe a great deal of thanks to the people who are researching these important issues.

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What is Pleural Mesothelioma?

What is Pleural Mesothelioma?

Pleural Mesothelioma is a type of cancer that is most often found in people who have, at some point during their lives been exposed to high levels of asbestos. Asbestos is a type of naturally occurring mineral that was, for many years mixed with cement, plaster and paint and used in the interiors of houses. It was used as it is highly resistant to heat and is surprisingly strong. Unfortunately asbestos is made up of thin fibres which have since been found to be highly toxic to humans when they get into the body and it is these fibres that can be breathed in and cause a large number of health problems.

Due to the way that asbestos acts once inside the body it is usually many years later that asbestos related Pleural Mesothelioma is noticed. Pleural Mesothelioma is normally diagnosed when there is a change in the thin layer of membranes that are in the chest. When this pleural lining thickens or starts to calcify it is known as pleural plaques. These plaques in themselves are not always a definite precursor to cancer but they can greatly affect the function of the lungs and they can signal the start of Pleural Mesothelioma.

Pleural Mesothelioma may begin in the pleura but it can soon radiate outwards to the abdomen, the heart and the outer wall of the chest. When this happens and a diagnosis of Pleural Mesothelioma is made the prognosis is not good and many patients with Pleural Mesothelioma are not expected to live much longer than 12 months or so. With this in mind it is critical that anyone who has had previous exposure to asbestos is regularly tested for any changes in the pleura as this is an early sign that Pleural Mesothelioma could be imminent. When Pleural Mesothelioma is suspected early enough the patient can be treated and this can help them to live much longer than someone who has been diagnosed with full blown Pleural Mesothelioma.

Some of the symptoms of Pleural Mesothelioma are pain in the lower back, shortness of breath and pain towards the side of the chest. Some people may have problems when swallowing, have a cough that will not go away and in some cases a patient might even be coughing up blood. Some people also find that they start to lose weight quite rapidly once the disease sets in.

As the outlook for a person with Pleural Mesothelioma is not good as treatment can be quite limited due to the aggressive nature of the disease. If the disease is caught quickly enough surgery can help to remove the pleura that are affected and the patient will live for longer than someone with advanced Pleural Mesothelioma. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are also options that some doctors will use to further extend the life of their patient but this does need to be carefully considered. Painkillers are used to keep the patient as comfortable as possible and other complimentary therapies can be used.

information about Mesothelioma? Our website provides many useful information including

mesothelioma symptoms, mesothelioma treatments and mesothelioma stages. The site also provided details information about different type of mesothelioma: Malignant Mesothelioma, Pleural Mesothelioma, Pericardial mesothelioma and Peritoneal mesothelioma


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