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Survival May Depend on Race, Study Finds

Survival May Depend on Race, Study Finds

Copyright (c) 2009 Katie Kelley

Researchers have found that disparities may exist between the survival of lung cancer patients between various races, particularly among African Americans who are at a greater risk of fatality following a lung cancer diagnosis compared to those of other races, according to a report from the University of Washington, Seattle researchers.

The study used informational data from 17,739 patients that were of the average age of 75 years old. The data was collected during the time period of 1992 to 2002. Of the patients, approximately 89 percent were of the Caucasian race while only 6 percent were African Americans. According to the research, “black patients recommended to surgery had lung resections less frequently than white patients.”

The report found that as long as African American patients received “recommended appropriate treatment” the disparities shrank considerably, however, that has not been the case thus far, according to a Science Daily news article. Scientists were only able to speculate as to why the disparities occurred between the two races, but reasoned the following differences may be occurring:

* patients may be less inclined to undergo surgery

* patients may be have limited access to appropriate care

* patients may be less likely to visit the physician

However, if these patients had received a proper adjustment or treatment, then “no significant association between race and death” would have occurred, according to the news article.

Lung Cancer Causes

While the Oncology Channel notes that tobacco smoke is responsible for “80 percent of lung cancer deaths in men and 75 percent of lung cancer deaths in women,” there are a significant number of other risk factors that can lead to an individual’s diagnosis of lung cancer. Several risks commonly associated with this include the following:

* secondhand smoke

* asbestos

* radon

* occupational exposures

* age

* race

* sex

* hereditary

It is imperative that in order for a lung cancer patient to receive the best appropriate method of treatment that he/she contact a medical professional at the first signs and symptoms of their potential condition. The following are reoccurring signs and symptoms among lung cancer victims, according to the Mayo Clinic:

* hoarseness

* wheezing

* chest pain

* coughing up blood

* development of chronic cough, also smoker’s cough

* new cough that does not go away

Defining Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a deadly form of lung cancer that is caused after the inhalation of asbestos fibers and dust particles has occurred. The New Zealand National Occupational Health and Safety Advisory Committee reported that individuals working in the construction industry, or a similar field, are at the most risk for developing mesothelioma cancer:

* asbestos workers

* auto mechanics

* miners

* millers

* machinery fitters

* boilermakers

* firemen

* waterside workers

* railway workers

* construction workers

Individuals who have worked in any of the above fields or a similar work environment are advised to seek medical attention if any of the above signs and symptoms develop. Additionally, it is important that an individuals suffering from mesothelioma cancer contact an environmental toxin attorney to learn about developing a mesothelioma lawsuit.

It is often necessary to create such litigation as a mesothelioma diagnosis is frequently delivered with expensive treatment options and a short life expectancy. By creating a mesothelioma lawsuit an individual is increasing their chance of receiving monetary compensation as an award for their debilitating condition.

Individuals can obtain more information on the mesothelioma risks by visiting http://mesothelioma.legalview.com or http://www.LegalView.info/. Here, readers can locate the latest on the peanut butter recall as well as how to garner legal advice from an automobile accident attorney.


Article from articlesbase.com

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