Posts Tagged ‘Rates’

New Gene Test Provides Approximate Survival Rates for Mesothelioma Patients

New Gene Test Provides Approximate Survival Rates for Mesothelioma Patients

According to a study published in the May 6 Journal of the National Cancer Institute(JNCI), scientists have recently devised a test that can accurately predict which mesothelioma patients have the best chance for survival. The test is also useful for identifying which patients would be the best candidates for surgery, another treatment option for mesothelioma cancer.

The test works by identifying the ratios of four genes present in tissue samples of mesothelioma cancer patients and comparing them with samples of tissue from patients who have survived mesothelioma cancer for an extended period of time. The gene test proved to provide consistent and easily repeatable results across different research campuses. Despite different technicians using different instruments in different laboratories, the test showed a high efficacy rate.

The test was devised by Dr. Raphael Bueno, the Associate Chief in the Division of Thoracic Surgery and Director of the Thoracic Surgery Residency Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Previously, predicting a patient’s prognosis was an invasive process; according to Dr. Bueno, major surgery was required to adequately predict the outcome. In the interest of creating a more accessible, less invasive, and accurately informative test, Dr. Bueno and his team looked to preexisting cancer tests. Specifically, the team looked at two gene-based testing methods that have been used in predicting breast cancer recurrence. Though this technology has not been widely used due to heavy logistical requirements, the inspiration provided enough incentive to help Dr. Bueno and his team develop what could be one of the biggest steps forward in accurate mesothelioma diagnosis in recent years.

The study announced in the JNCI was to determine how accurately the test predicted the survival rates of patients. Researchers examined samples of tissue from 120 mesothelioma patients and followed their cases until 2007 or until their death. Using the gene ratio test, researchers categorized the participants in two groups: a good outcome group, and a poor outcome group. On average, the poor outcome group survived 9.5 months; the good outcome group survived 16.8 months, almost double the rate of survival.

Since this test is so revealing about the survival rates of patients, it provides an opportunity for families and individuals to choose the best treatment option for mesothelioma cancer. Patients with good gene ratio test results could be more likely to benefit from surgery, while those in the lower survival rate group seek the best supportive care available.

Mesothelioma is often a very debilitating condition that may require large amounts of physical therapy and treatment options as well as require thousands of dollars in medical costs. It is common for many patients to discuss a mesothelioma lawsuit with an experienced personal injury attorney.

By contacting a mesothelioma lawyer, a patient is increasing their chances of receiving monetary funds as a compensation for the damages endured because of mesothelioma cancer. Additionally, a mesothelioma lawsuit may also result in the reimbursement of expensive medical bills as well as open the door for patients to receive costly medical care that they may have otherwise been able to afford or receive.

For more information on mesothelioma, visit http://mesothelioma.legalview.com for access to a wide variety or resources, including a mesothelioma attorney, a
mesothelioma lawsuit
, and a mesothelioma lawyer. LegalView also provides access to a construction accident lawyer as well.


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Cement Workers Asbestos Fiber Concentrations and Mortality Rates

Cement Workers Asbestos Fiber Concentrations and Mortality Rates

It has been proven that the inhalation of asbestos fibers can lead to a variety of health problems ranging from asthma to cancer.  Another interesting study that explored mesothelioma rates in an asbestos cement factory is called, “Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.” By M J Gardner, P D Winter, B Pannett, C A Powell – British Journal of Industrial Medicine 1986;43:726-732.  Here is an excerpt: “A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung cancer was observed in the mortality follow up by comparison with either national or local death rates, and analyses of subgroups of the workforce by job, exposure level, duration of employment, duration since entry, or calendar years of employment gave no real suggestion of an asbestos related excess for this cause of death. There was one death from pleural mesothelioma and one with asbestosis mentioned as an associated cause on the death certificate, but neither is thought to be linked to asbestos exposure at this factory. Other suggested asbestos related cancers, such as laryngeal and gastrointestinal, did not show raised risks. Although the durations of exposure were short in this study, the findings are consistent with two other studies of workers exposed to low concentrations of chrysotile fibre in the manufacture of asbestos cement products which reported no excess mortality.”

Another interesting study is called, “Respiratory function changes after asbestos pleurisy.” By P H Wright, A Hanson, L Kreel, L H Capel – Thorax 1980;35:31-36.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Six patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse pleural thickening after industrial asbestos exposure are described. Five had computed tomography of the thorax. All the scans showed marked circumferential pleural thickening often with calcification, and four showed no significant evidence of intrapulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis). Lung function testing showed reduction of the inspiratory capacity and the single-breath carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO). The transfer coefficient, calculated as the TLCO divided by the alveolar volume determined by helium dilution during the measurement of TLCO, was increased.

Pseudo-static compliance curves showed markedly more negative intrapleural pressures at all lung volumes than found in normal people. These results suggest that the circumferential pleural thickening was preventing normal lung expansion despite abnormally great distending pressures. The pattern of lung function tests is sufficiently distinctive for it to be recognised in clinical practice, and suggests that the lungs are held rigidly within an abnormal pleura. The pleural thickening in our patients may have been related to the condition described as “benign asbestos pleurisy” rather than the interstitial fibrosis of asbestosis.”

Another interesting study is called, “Cancer in a Factory Using Amosite Asbestos” by Gardner M J, Winter P D and Bennett C. Cancer in a factory using amosite asbestos. International Journal of Epidemiology 1984; 13: 3–10.   Here is an excerpt: “The paper describes the mortality experience of 5969 men employed in a factory where insulation board was manufactured using amosite asbestos from 1947 to 1979. 422 (7%) of the men were known to have died by the end of 1980. Among the 4820 men engaged in the manufacture of insulation board a doubling of the risk of lung cancer has occurred (57 deaths observed; 29 deaths expected). An excess is present both in men who entered the factory before and after 1960. Among the 2461 for whom smoking information is available a detectable excess risk is limited to current smokers exposed to higher levels of asbestos. Apart from five deaths from mesothelioma no statistically large or significant excesses of mortality from cancers of other sites have occurred, but further follow-up of the cohort is in progress. Nine deaths from asbestosis have been recorded. The results are discussed in the light of other studies of the effects of exposure to amosite asbestos.”

If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.  We all owe a great debt to these researchers for their important work.

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article.  For more information please click on the following links  Mesothelioma Lawyer,

Mesothelioma Lawsuit Settlements,

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Louisiana Asbestos Cement Workers and Mortality Rates

Louisiana Asbestos Cement Workers and Mortality Rates

One interesting study is called, “Histologic type of lung cancer and asbestos exposure” by Oscar Auerbach MD, Lawrence Garfinkel MA, Verta R. Parks BS, Alfred S. Conston MD, Vincent A. Galdi MD, Lou Jouberti,- Cancer Volume 54, Issue 12, pages 3017–3021, 15 December 1984.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – The histologic types of lung cancer in 855 patients (747 men and 107 women) from three hospitals and one international study of insulation workers were evaluated. Of these, 196 cases had asbestos exposure. About one half of the cases were diagnosed from surgical slides and one half from autopsy slides. Squamous cell carcinoma constituted the largest percentage of tumor types and was found with the same frequency in exposed and nonexposed groups. Small cell carcinoma was found in 25% of the exposed and in 15% of the nonexposed patients. Upper lung sites were involved in about two thirds of the cases with asbestos exposure and lower lobes in the other one third. There was little difference in histologic type in cases regardless of whether upper or lower lobes were involved. Cigarette smokers who smoked until their cancer diagnosis showed no difference in histologic type by amount smoked, and slight but not statistically significant differences from ex-cigarette smokers.”

Another interesting study is called, “Asbestos and Gastrointestinal Cancer – A Review of the Literature” by Robert W. Morgan, MD, Donna E. Foliart, MD, MPH, and Otto Wong, ScD – West J Med. 1985 July; 143(1): 60–65.   Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, we listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, we calculated summary SMRs for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners.Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMRs remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis.Based on the results after reanalysis, the elevations in summary SMRs for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer are of a magnitude that could result from diagnostic and investigator error. We conclude that more studies are required before stomach and colorectal cancers are documented as asbestos-related diseases.”

Another interesting study is called, “Lung cancer risk associated with manufacture of asbestos-cement products.” By Hughes J, Weill H. – IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):627-35.  Here is an excerpt: “Abstract – The mortality experience of a cohort of 5645 Louisiana asbestos-cement workers with a minimum follow-up of 20 years was related to total dust, duration and concentration of exposure and fibre type. Excess respiratory cancer risk was detected in workers with moderate and heavy asbestos dust exposure, but no excess risk occurred in categories of lower exposure. Mortality due to all other causes was normal. Both duration and level of exposure were shown to contribute to risk; both variables exhibited levels at which no excess mortality was detected. Workers exposed to both chrysotile and crocidolite appeared to be at greater risk of respiratory malignancy than those with exposure to chrysotile only.”

If you found any of these excerpts interesting, please read the studies in their entirety.  We all owe a debt of gratitude to these researchers for their hard work.

 

Monty Wrobleski is the author of this article, for more information please click on the following links

Depuy Hip Recall

Depuy Hip Recall

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Early Prognosis Increases Lung Cancer Survival Rates

Early Prognosis Increases Lung Cancer Survival Rates

Although it is a dreaded situation that nobody desires to speak about; each and every patient and household member would like to know about their possibilities for surviving lung cancer. Its essential to know from a health-related point of view and its essential to know from a individual, emotional stage of view. Most individuals prefer hard survival charge statistics, though they realize that every affected person is different and every cancer malignancy cell is unpredictable.
The 1st and most essential criteria is the stage in which, the most cancers exists inside the sufferers physique at that time of prognosis. Has it developed to other elements of the body, in specific the brain, whereby chances of full or even partial recovery are very poor. Even with aggressive treatment, surviving late state lung most cancers is a tremendous job for anybody.
A main factor that will also influence the charge of survival is the basic health and health-related historical past of the affected person. Physicians are extremely concerned about a number of conditions that a affected person could at present have which could contribute to the unfold of the most cancers. Is the individual already symptomatic, showing indicators such as coughing and difficulty breathing; in which case the most cancers has advanced and reduces the survival charge. Apart from obtaining the greatest therapy possible, it’s essential to stay in great bodily and mental shape. Winning the battle against most cancers is a great challenge even for a patient in great physical problem. Keeping a excellent attitude and staying as healthy as feasible are paramount in the success of any health-related therapy.
Roughly 16% of sufferers initially identified with lung most cancers still only have localized cancer. This means that it has not yet unfold to other elements of the body. This is the greatest diagnosis, it indicates that a patient’ chances of survival are fairly high. It is essential to know that roughly 37% of those who are identified with lung most cancers are in the latter stages where the most cancers has unfold to the lymph nodes or other elements of the physique, complicating the problem, and reducing the survival fee significantly.
An even larger quantity of individuals, around 39 percent, are not identified until right after the cancer has had a likelihood to distribute to far-reaching parts of the physique, what is called the distant stage of cancer malignancy. It has metastasized and is no longer confined to just the lungs. When this occurs, therapy choices are very limited, and occasionally therapy is discouraged altogether because of the hopelessness of the scenario.
In the many years in between 1995 and 2002, a examine was carried out to figure out the survival rate of individuals whom had been diagnosed with lung cancer malignancy 5 many years earlier. The research identified that roughly 17 p.c of white women survived, 10 % of black males, and almost 15 percent of black ladies. Though interesting and useful for medical doctors and scientists to treat lung most cancers; most cancers survival in common depends on a host of diverse elements that make statistics meaningless!
Most instances of lung most cancers are analysis Just before any symptoms appear in the affected person! Early detection and diagnosis has usually been the plea of cancer medical doctors. Anybody with a background of cancer in their families, have had the possibility of exposure to asbestos, heavy user of tobacco goods, and so on. ought to have medical examinations frequently by an skilled cancer specialist.
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Mesothelioma Prognosis – Life Expectancy & Survival Rates

Mesothelioma Prognosis – Life Expectancy & Survival Rates

The term prognosis is used to describe the likely outcome of a disease, how long a diagnosed patient is expected to live, and the quality of life expected during that time.  This article discusses the prognosis for mesothelioma patients affected on a multitude of levels.

Once a patient is diagnosed, a doctor will likely discuss their prognosis, or probable course and outcome of the cancer’s influence on the body.  The best way to avoid a poor prognosis is through early detection.  As a result, the prognosis for the majority of patients is poor, but many doctors can recommend treatment options such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation to help combat the disease. 

In addition to the stage of the cancer and the age of the patient, other factors that affect prognosis include: The type of mesothelioma – pleural, peritoneal, pericardial or testicular The size of the tumor, the location of the tumor, and whether it can be surgically removed, the extent of other symptoms, including fluid in the lungs or abdomen and whether or not the patient is a smoker. 

Though numerous factors affect a patient’s prognosis such as age, overall health, and the type of mesothelioma the patient is battling, the average length of survival reported throughout the last five years has been 10 to 11 months after diagnosis.  Early detection of pleural mesothelioma can improve a patient’s mesothelioma prognosis considerably, and these patients have more extensive treatment options. 

Patients diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma in stage one or two generally have greater treatment options and a better prognosis.  Pleural mesothelioma patients who are not diagnosed early enough for curative treatment have fewer treatment options, mostly limited to palliative treatments, designed to relieve pain and discomfort to improve a patient’s quality of life, rather than their prognosis. 

If a patient is diagnosed once the disease has reached the advanced stages, treatment options are limited and prognosis is often compromised.  A patient’s overall health status and age greatly affects the prognosis.  Cancer that has not metastasized to other areas of the body gives physicians a lot more treatment options and improves a patient’s prognosis dramatically. 

Pleural mesothelioma patients have a poorer prognosis if they are experiencing chest pain, shortness of breath, inability to perform daily tasks, weight loss, a low red blood cell count, a high white blood cell count, and high blood levels of a substance called LDH (lactate dehydrogenase, an enzyme).  Pleural mesothelioma patients who experience these symptoms usually receive a prognosis ranging between six and 12 months. 

The median survival of patients diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma from time of first dignosis is one year; in male patients or those with elevated white-cell counts, thrombocytosis or anemia, the prognosis is far worse.  The presence of certain biochemical markers, as well increased vascularity or the presence of the SV40 virus in the tumor, are other indicators that the prognosis would be more serious.  The fibrosarcomatus type carries the worst prognosis, while the mixed (a combination of both kinds) comes in between them.

However, many have overcome such a poor prognosis and have prolonged their life in a multitude of ways.    

Have you been affected by mesothelioma? Learn more at: Mesothelioma Disease Blog


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Study Finds Increased Mesothelioma Death Rates In A Group Of Shipyard Workers

Study Finds Increased Mesothelioma Death Rates In A Group Of Shipyard Workers

A recent study conducted on workers in a US Coast Guard shipyard has found a significantly greater mortality rate associated with lung cancer and mesothelioma compared to the general population. The study also found an increased general mortality rate.

The study followed 4702 (4413 men and 289 women) civilian workers who were employed at the shipyard between January 1950 and December 1964. The study then measured the number of deaths and their causes through 31 December 2001.

The study was conducted by S Krstev, P Stewart, J Rusiecki, A Blair and was published in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The original study publication is available at http://oem.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/64/10/651.

Mesothelioma is a form of cancer that is usually associated with exposure to asbestos. The majority of individuals who are diagnosed with mesothelioma have a history of exposure to asbestos particles at work or home. Family members of workers have also been affected. Renovators of homes containing asbestos cement material are accounting for an increasing number of diagnosed sufferers. Symptoms of mesothelioma may not appear for decades after the exposure to asbestos. Symptoms include abdominal pain and weight loss. Diagnosis of mesothelioma can be difficult due to the fact that the symptoms are similar to other respiratory diseases.

Since mesothelioma is primarily caused by exposure to asbestos, mesothelioma can be best be prevented by avoiding or limiting exposure to asbestos in homes, public buildings, and at work. Workers that may be at risk include miners, factory workers, insulation manufacturers, railroad workers, ship builders, contractors and construction workers, particularly those involved with insulation. If there is a possibility of exposure (such as when renovating old buildings) protective equipment should be used and safety procedures should be applied. Asbestos was commonly used in building materials due to its durability and fire-resistant properties. In addition to buildings, asbestos was used in the manufacture of cars and ships and many other products.

Sam Gurgis is a scientific writer and the webmaster at mesotheliomawise.org and sam-gurgis.com


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